Ozarka College will host their Seventh Annual Holiday event on December 1 from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. This event is free to the public and will take place in the John E. Miller Education complex, at Ozarka College in Melbourne.
This year’s theme is, Holidays in Who-ville and families are invited to join Ozarka College for a Dr. Seuss themed night. There will be festive stations for the kids to do coloring activities and play games, treats prepared by the Ozarka College Culinary Arts Department, and of course, pictures with Santa.
In the words of Dr. Seuss, “My town is called Who-ville, for I am a Who and we Whos are all thankful and grateful to you.” That idea can be echoed by Ozarka College, as we are grateful to be able to provide life-changing experiences through education. Ozarka College looks forward to giving back to the community with this fun filled, family friendly event. In the case of inclement weather, this event will not be rescheduled. For more information about Holidays in Who-ville, please contact Suellen Davidson at 870-368-2059 or sdavidson@ozarka.edu.


DISTRICT AND STATE CHAMPIONS: Izard County Consolidated FFA Shooting Sports Team brought home four individual trophies from the Second Annual FFA Shooting Sports Contest on Friday, November 17 at the AGFC Shooting Complex in Jacksonville. Hayden Ekenes and James Morris both shot a perfect score of 50/50, out of the 22 schools participating. After a shootoff, Ekenes came out as Champion of the contest. In the awards ceremony, Ekenes received two trophies, the Eastern District 1st Place Individual Male, and the Arkansas State FFA 1st Place Individual Male Champion. Morris received a trophy for the Arkansas State 2nd Place Individual Male, and Kassey Martin received a trophy for the Eastern District 1st Place Individual Female. ICC FFA Advisor and Shooting Sports coach Wayne Neal said, “I am very proud of the team and it was an honor to be recognized for having the top male and female individual shooters in the Eastern District, and to have the top two male individual shooters in the State.”


by Karen Sherrell
On November 21, Matt Orf, age 39 of Oxford, entered a negotiated plea of guilty to a felony charge filed November 1 in Izard County.
Orf appeared before Judge Tim Weaver in Independence County Circuit Court in Batesville, where he pled guilty to criminal use of property or laundering criminal proceeds, a class c felony, according to his sentencing order.
Orf was sentenced to three years suspended imposition of sentence and ordered to pay $9,250 restitution to Izard County, jointly with his father-in-law David Sherrell, former Izard County Judge.
Sherrell pled guilty on November 6 to criminal use of property or laundering criminal proceeds, forgery (two counts), and theft, and was sentenced to six years in the Regional Correctional Facility in Osceola. Sherrell was ordered to pay $35,000 restitution, and is currently serving his sentence.
According to Dr. Charles Allen, Chief Administrator of the Arkansas Correctional School District, Orf has been employed by the school district for approximately two years as a teacher, stationed at the North Central Unit at Calico Rock. Allen stated, “Orf was suspended with pay pending the outcome of court case, until resolved.”
Sherrell, Orf and Paul Shuttleworth were arrested following an investigation by Dennis Simons, with the Arkansas State Police, when Sixteenth Judicial Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer opened the case in February of 2017. Charges filed were in connection with the purchase and sale of a 20 ton trailer, purchase of a John Deere road grader and a Case bulldozer, and theft of tools and equipment, all belonging to Izard County. Simons found discrepancies of equipment purchases and sales during his investigation, dating from March 2015 through December 2016.
Orf was charged in connection with the sale of the trailer. He was also ordered to pay $2,920 in fines and court costs when he appeared in court. Orf was represented by Attorney L. Gray Dellinger of Melbourne.
Shuttleworth was charged with forgery in the second degree, in connection with the purchase of the road graders, and waived arraignment in Izard County Circuit Court on Wednesday, November 22. He is represented by Attorney Ralph Blagg of Clinton, and is to appear in Izard County on January 16.


Saturday, December 2 will be a fun-filled day in Horseshoe Bend beginning with the 2017 Winterfest Christmas Parade. This year’s theme is Christmas in the Bend.
The parade begins at 10 a.m. and everyone is welcome to enter the parade. New this year, the parade will have a rain delay/cancellation policy. If it is raining too hard at 9:30 a.m., the parade will have a one hour delay and a hopeful start time of 11 a.m. If it is still raining at 11 a.m., the parade will be canceled and Santa will make his appearance at the chamber office directly following the announcement of parade cancelation.
Also new this year, parade floats will need to enter the parade line up from Highway 289/S. Bend Drive. From there, early arrival floats will turn left on First Street, right on Profession Drive and right on Third Street. The first float (after dignitaries) will begin the parade line at the corner of Third and Church Street until directed to move forward. Floats will be lined up in order of arrival, not by category and will receive entry forms once in line. Prizes will be awarded for first through third place with points being earned for theme, originality and overall appearance of the float.
Following the parade, Santa will be at the chamber office, and all children are welcome to come visit with Santa. The Horseshoe Bend Volunteer Fire Department will be offering hot dogs, brats and other concessions.
The 20th Annual Festival of Trees will be held at Cedar Glade Resort in Horseshoe Bend at 900 Fourth Street.
Everyone is invited to come and see the variety of decorations and creativity on Saturday, December 2 and Sunday, December 3, sponsored by the Horseshoe Bend Area Chamber of Commerce and Cedar Glade Resort.
Area clubs, churches, businesses and civic organizations are encouraged to place a decorated tree in the resort lobby, which is open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
“Every year we have some truly spectacular Christmas trees in the festival,” said chairman Karen Sherrell. “Some of the holiday trees reflect a theme, and are really clever.”
Theme forms are available at the Chamber of Commerce office located at 707 S. Third Street. Forms include name of club, organization or business, theme of tree, and a short narrative of the Christmas tree to be included in the Festival of Trees program. Forms need to be returned to the Chamber office by Thursday, November 30.
Christmas trees may be put in place beginning the day after Thanksgiving Day, November 23, and must be in place no later than Friday, December 1. Trees will remain for public viewing thorough the end of the year. Past themes include, Where do the unsold Christmas trees go, Let it snow, Gone fishin’, Volunteer angels ringing bells throughout the ages, Merry Beaded Christmas, and of course you may just enter a tree themed Merry Christmas to All.
Get your ideas in place and get to decorating for the Annual Festival of Trees to be held at Cedar Glade Resort in Horseshoe Bend.
So everyone come on out and get in the holiday spirit on Saturday, December 2 in Horseshoe Bend!
The 24th Annual Spirit of Lights Lighting Contest is now underway.
Everyone is encouraged to light up Horseshoe Bend, from Main Street to residences. Deadline to enter is Friday, December 15 at noon.


REALTOR OF THE YEAR: Jessie Friend (l) was presented the Tri-County Board Realtor of the Year award on Thursday, November 16. She lives in Hardy with her son Emmett. Pictured with Friend is the 2018 Arkansas Realtor’s Association President Velda Lueders. The Realtor of the Year award is presented to someone with high personal and professional principles. The recipients are members of the community with reputable business accomplishments, members of their local board and participate in state events. See the Tri-County Board of Realtor’s Installation of Officers on page 4 of this week’s edition of Pacesetting Times.


On Thursday, November 23, the Horseshoe Bend United Methodist Church will host a Thanksgiving Dinner for the community at 1 p.m.
The church will provide turkey, mashed potatoes, gravy, rolls and beverages. The rest of the meal will be potluck dishes brought by those attending, a side dish is not required to attend. There will be no carry-outs. There is no charge for this meal, so come and enjoy!
The Church is located at 600 West Church Street. For reservations call 870-670-5392.


by Cassie Stafford
The Izard County Republican Committee held their monthly meeting on Tuesday, November 15 at 6 p.m. at the Melbourne Community Church.
Dorothy Grochowski read the October minutes. The Treasurer’s Report was given. The committee had $759.49 in their account and received $50 towards dues for two new members that joined the night of the meeting.
The committee decided to make a decision about filing fees at their December 12 meeting. The filing fees are used to support candidates for their election. Also in December, the committee will collect dues. The cost is $25 per person for two years.
Trevor Drown, candidate for Treasurer of State, will be the guest speaker at the January 9 meeting. Tommy Land, candidate for Commissioner of Land, will speak at the February 13 meeting. The committee is working on getting a speaker about the Federal Reserves for the December meeting.
Mark Herrington spoke to the committee and guests about the benefits of having a medical marijuana dispensary in Izard County and the use of medical marijuana. “Honestly and truly, it’s a drug just like any other drug, it’s just not thought of in the same light. It has benefits and it has drawbacks. From what I’ve seen, there are a lot of people who, particularly, when they get to the end stages of their life, things don’t work the way they should. Medicine doesn’t help with the pain, it doesn’t help with appetite, it doesn’t make their quality of life that they have left, much of anything,” said Herrington.
Herrington has been involved in the application process for an extended period. “I can tell you there are a lot of questions that nobody knows the answers to.” The application process was very involved and invasive. Application page count has ranged from several dozen to over 2,000.
He said that at this time people are not even sure where their supply will be coming from due to the fact that people applying for cultivation had to apply at the same time as people applying for a dispensary.
According to the Arkansas Cannabis Industry Association, there were 95 cultivation applications received and 227 dispensary applications. In Zone 2, which covers Izard and Fulton County, there were four applications received for cultivation and 17 for dispensaries; including one application for cultivation and two for dispensaries in Izard County. Sharp County is included in Zone 3 and had two application for cultivation and three for dispensaries submitted.
Herrington explained that his personal opinion on legalizing marijuana for medical use is a very positive thing because it eliminates underhanded use. He said he thinks that it will be highly monitored and supervised for the entire state by, the way he understands it, the Federal Government and not the State Government. “Which is another thing that brings up a lot of problems, I think that is where a lot of the drawbacks to this are coming from, the Federal Level,” said Herrington.
A person will not be able to go to a pharmacy to pick up marijuana, there will be separate facilities. “My facility that I am proposing is going to be set up exactly like a pharmacy and I’m going to have a semi-retired pharmacist run it,” Herrington stated. The dispensary will be regulated by the Federal Government unlike a pharmacy that is State regulated.
Herrington said, “As far as positive benefits, I think it has a lot of them. I think it is safer than a lot of drugs.” Alcohol and pain pills are much harder on your body than marijuana. “You hardly ever hear of anyone that gets used to marijuana, so I think it is a good thing and a lot less toxic to your body, long term and short term, than the majority of the medications that we have to offer you.”
Herrington has been at his pharmacy in Melbourne for 22 years and the number of people addicted to prescription medications in all age groups has astounded him. “It’s pretty sad, but drug addiction doesn’t have an age boundary, from old enough to buy it themselves to so old that they can’t go and get it themselves. I’m hoping from my standpoint and from a medical standpoint, that given this option about marijuana addiction treatment, it will help some of that.”
He explained that he thinks medical marijuana will be cheaper than the current system to the taxpayers due to spending less time and money on treatments of people and hospital stays. The medicine that is used now is almost as bad as the diseases themselves due to the side effects and many people end up in the hospital because of them. “Don’t get me wrong, you’re not going to prolong someone’s life a lot longer, but you’ll make whatever they have a lot more comfortable.” He does not think that insurance or government agencies will cover the cannabis, that it will be purchased by cash only.
“Instead of running away from it and saying it’s a bad thing, I think we need to look at it and say, ‘Hey, if you keep hiding it, all it’s ever going to be is negative’. You can get some positive out of it if you choose to and I think it is a good thing. I think even if it was made recreational, it would be healthier than people drinking or popping pills. A lot of people disagree with that, but as far as physically, I’m going to tell you it would be. Marijuana is good,” Herrington concluded.


by Karen Sherrell
SHARP COUNTY — A woman has been found competent to proceed to trial, according to recent findings in her fitness to proceed and criminal responsibility examinations.
Jennifer Lea Collins, age 55, was charged with murder second degree, after the death of an elderly woman in her care in May. She had been incarcerated at the Sharp County Jail since the crime on May 11. Following an autopsy of the victim, a change in charges, from battery first degree to murder second degree, was filed on Collins on August 16. She was released on a $100,000 bond, after her court appearance before Judge Mark Johnson.
Collins, according to the affidavit of arrest in the case, had attacked 92 year old Jane Sandefur, at her home in Cherokee Village. Collins had been hired as a caregiver for Sandefur. The victim sustained serious injuries to her face, arms, legs and chest, all from being bitten. Collins smelled of alcohol, according to the affidavit, and was not making any sense in answering questions or making statements to officers.
According to court orders, Collins, through her attorney, requested simultaneous fitness to proceed and criminal responsibility examinations. Examination results were filed with the Sharp County Clerk’s office on November 20, and summarize that Collins has the capacity to understand her charges, and is competent to stand trial, which could be in January.
Bond restrictions on Collins, who shows her address as just doors down from her victim’s home on Mixtec Drive in Cherokee Village, are to have no contact with Sandefur’s family, nor go within one mile of the family members, residences or places of employment.
Collins is facing a minimum six years up to 30 years on the charge of second degree murder. She was additionally charged with abuse of endangered or impaired person, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.
Attorney R.T. Starken of Cherokee Village is representing Collins in the case.


by Karen Sherrell
SHARP COUNTY — Following an autopsy of her victim, a change in charges, from battery first degree to murder second degree, were filed on Jennifer Lea Collins on August 16. Collins was released on $100,000 bond the following day, after her court appearance before Judge Mark Johnson.
According to Deputy Prosecuting Attorney Tom Garner in August, charges were upgraded to murder second degree, in the case of an elderly woman being attacked by her caregiver, Collins, and subsequently dying.
Collins, according to the affidavit of arrest in the case, had attacked 92 year old Jane Sandefur, at her home in Cherokee Village. Collins had been hired as a caregiver for Sandefur. The victim sustained serious injuries to her face, arms, legs and chest, all from being bitten. Collins smelled of alcohol, according to the affidavit, and was not making any sense in answering questions or making statements to officers.
Collins, age 55, had been incarcerated at the Sharp County Jail since the crime on May 11. According to court orders, Collins, through her attorney, requested simultaneous fitness to proceed and criminal responsibility examinations. The Director of the Division of Behavioral Health Services of the DHS was to determine who will examine Collins, who intends to rely on the defense of mental disease or defect.
According to the Sharp County Clerk’s office, no examination results have been filed as of November 14.
Bond restrictions on Collins, who shows her address as just doors down from her victim’s home on Mixtec Drive in Cherokee Village, are to have no contact with Sandefur’s family, nor go within one mile of the family members, residences or places of employment.
Collins is facing a minimum six years up to 30 years on the charge of second degree murder. She was additionally charged with abuse of endangered or impaired person, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct.
Attorney R.T. Starken of Cherokee Village is representing Collins in the case.
Proseucting Attorney Henry Boyce stated in August, “After carefully reviewing the evidence in this case including a review of the autopsy and consultation with the Crime Lab Medical Examiner, I decided that the upgrade in charges was warranted.”


It is time again to renew your annual business license. You may come into Horseshoe Bend City Hall to renew for 2018, or for your convenience you may renew by mail, over the phone or online. If renewing by mail, return a copy of your last year’s licenses after making any necessary changes then return the form along with your check. If you would like to receive a copy of your 2018 city business license, please enclose a self-addressed envelope along with your payment and current changes.
The City of Horseshoe Bend requires an annual license fee to be paid by any person, firm or corporation that maintains a business location within the City of Horseshoe Bend, or engages in any business, profession or occupation of any kind and nature within the city. The business license fees are classified in City Ordinance 87-14 that is available for your inspection at City Hall and states: “It is hereby declared a misdemeanor for any person, firm or corporation carrying on a business, profession or occupation within the City of Horseshoe Bend who fails and/or refused to comply with any of the provisions of this Ordinance and upon conviction shall be fined in an amount of not less than $100 nor more than $200 for each separate violation.” Also due for 2018 renewal are dog and cat licenses at $3 for spayed and neutered animals (must have proof) and $10 for un-spayed and un-neutered pets. Please bring proof of rabies vaccination also.


by Karen Sherrell
On November 6, former Izard County Judge David Sherrell entered a negotiated plea of guilty to charges, formally filed five days earlier, of criminal use of property or laundering criminal proceeds, forgery (two counts) and theft.
Sherrell waved his right to a jury trial, and with his attorneys L. Gray Dellinger of Melbourne and Tom Thompson of Batesville, appeared before Circuit Court Judge Tim Weaver, who asked Sherrell if he understood the charges against him, to which Sherrell replied, “Yes.”
Sherrell was sentenced to six years in the Regional Correctional Facility in Osceola, and ordered to pay $35,000 restitution to the victim, the taxpayers of Izard County, plus $1,920 in fines and court costs.
“Basically we have to be good stewards of the taxpayer’s money,” said Izard County Judge Eric Smith. “It makes me sad when someone takes advantage of their power. We are to watch the money, spend it wisely and not steal from the public.”
According to Sherrell’s sentencing order, $25,750 is payable by Sherrell, and $9,250 is payable by Sherrell and his son-in-law Matt Orf. Payments must begin within 30 days of Sherrell’s release from prison, and be not less than $500 a month.
Sherrell, Orf and Paul Shuttleworth were arrested following an investigation into discrepancies of equipment purchases and sales from March 2015 through December 2016.
Sherrell, who served as the county judge from 2011 to 2016, was investigated by Dennis Simons, with the Arkansas State Police, when Sixteenth Judicial Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer opened the investigation in February 2017.
Charges were in connection with the purchase and sale of a 20 ton trailer, purchase of a John Deere road grader and a Case bulldozer, and theft of tools and equipment, all belonging to Izard County.
Orf was charged with criminal use of property or laundering criminal proceeds, in connection with the sale of the trailer, and Shuttleworth was charged with forgery in the second degree, in connection with the purchase of the road graders.
Both Orf and Shuttleworth are scheduled to appear in court on November 22.
Sherrell was reprimanded to the custody of Izard County authorities immediately following his plea agreement November 6. In lieu of the State charges, the U.S. Attorney’s office will not seek Federal charges, according to the agreement. Sherrell could face civil charges for ethics violations, through the Arkansas Ethics Commission.


by Sharlee Webb
The Franklin Extension Homemaker’s Club did not have a meeting in October. This is our travel month to deliver supplies to Little Rock. We go to Children’s Hospital, Ronald McDonald and the VA Hospital.
The trip was supposed to be on October 16, but things came up and it was postponed until October 30. We met at Brockwell to start our journey. We had ten ladies for the trip. Susan Williams drove the Izard County Senior Center bus. We want to thank both for helping us out.
Our first stop was the VA Hospital with lots of books and magazines. Two patients were outside as we delivered and they thanked us for giving them something to read.
Our next stop was Children’s Hospital. We had hats and supplies for their playroom. A friend of Susan Chapman made teddy bears that we delivered also.
Then we were off to the Ronald McDonald House with our supplies and soda tabs. We got to tour the first floor of their new home. The house was full at this time.
After the Ronald McDonald House we were off to Red Lobster for lunch. Our last stop was Hobby Lobby. We made it home around 6 p.m. It was a full day of fun, fellowship and heart-warming events. This trip was the most supplies we have delivered to these three place.
We had a great Craft Fair on October 28. There were around 30 vendors. We had the food court again this year. We sold out of everything except browning. We are now looking forward to the holidays. Our next meeting will be Monday, November 13 with hostesses Kathy Duncan and Sharlee Webb. We wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving!


The Old Main Schoolhouse in Salem will be the setting for an old-fashioned chili supper and pie auction Saturday, November 11, at 5 p.m. sponsored by the Friends of Old Main. Local and state elected officials and those considering a run for office are invited to meet and greet with attendees during the event.
There is no set admission fee; however, donations will be greatly appreciated to benefit the Old Main restoration project.
Attendees will have an additional opportunity to support Old Main by bidding on delicious pies prepared by foundation members and friends of Old Main. The foundation expects to have more than 50 pies available for auction that evening. Volunteers with the Friends of Old Main have worked during the past three years to renovate Old Main for use as a center for community activities. Recent additions include a central air conditioning unit for the auditorium.
For more information about the Fourth Annual Chili Supper and Pie Auction or the Old Main project, contact Patty Neal, president of the Friends of Old Main Board of Directors, at 870-710-0720.


The Old Main Schoolhouse in Salem will be the setting for an old-fashioned chili supper and pie auction Saturday, November 11, at 5 p.m. sponsored by the Friends of Old Main. Local and state elected officials and those considering a run for office are invited to meet and greet with attendees during the event.
There is no set admission fee; however, donations will be greatly appreciated to benefit the Old Main restoration project.
Attendees will have an additional opportunity to support Old Main by bidding on delicious pies prepared by foundation members and friends of Old Main. The foundation expects to have more than 50 pies available for auction that evening. Volunteers with the Friends of Old Main have worked during the past three years to renovate Old Main for use as a center for community activities. Recent additions include a central air conditioning unit for the auditorium.
For more information about the Fourth Annual Chili Supper and Pie Auction or the Old Main project, contact Patty Neal, president of the Friends of Old Main Board of Directors, at 870-710-0720.


Son-in-law and equipment salesman also charged in case
by Karen Sherrell
A former Izard County judge and two other men have been arrested following a nine month investigation into discrepancies of equipment purchases and other items involving the county judge’s office, and taxpayer’s money.
David Sherrell, Izard County Judge for three terms, from 2011 to 2016, has been charged with criminal use of property or laundering criminal proceeds, two counts of forgery, and theft of property, all four felonies.
Sixteenth Judicial Prosecuting Attorney Holly Meyer opened an investigation earlier this year, after reviewing alleged discrepancies during Sherrell’s term, specifically from March 2015 through December 2016.
According to court affidavits filed by Meyer on November 1 containing information from Dennis Simons, investigator with the Arkansas State Police, Sherrell’s charges were in connection with the purchase and sale of a 2001 Ameritrail 20 ton trailer, purchases of a John Deere 670B road grader and a Case 1150K bulldozer, and theft of tools and equipment in the amount of $3,500, all belonging to Izard County.
Affidavit and court filings
During Simons’ investigation, he discovered the purchase of two dump trucks for the Izard County Road Department in June of 2015.
Jeremy Purdue, of Coal Creek, LLC Truck and Equipment Sales, was approached by Sherrell for the purchase of the dump trucks along with an equipment trailer. Sherrell told the company that he could not obtain financing on the trailer and asked them to increase the price of the dump trucks to include the price of the trailer. Coal Creek presented two invoices to Sherrell for his signature, one for the two dump trucks totaling $83,000, and a second invoice for the trailer at no cost. The second invoice was not found in the county records, but was provided by Coal Creek.
The trailer was delivered on June 26, 2015 and Sherrell took personal possession of it. Perdue estimated the value of the trailer between $7,000 and $7,500. In July 2015, the Izard County Quorum Court approved financing the dump trucks, and the trailer acquisition was not disclosed to the Quorum Court. In November 2015 Sherrell arranged for the sale of the trailer from his son-in-law, Matt Orf, to the county. Orf presented a document that stated he was the owner of the trailer, and had the authority to sell the trailer, with Sherrell’s signature of approval. Sherrell approved to pay Orf $9,250 for the trailer, and on November 18, 2015, the county delivered a check for $9,250 to Sherrell. The check was endorsed by Orf and Sherrell and bank records show on that date that $3,000 was deposited in the Sherrell Farm Account, $3,000 was deposited in the Sherrell personal account, and $3,250 was cashed. Simons’ summary in the trailer investigation stated, “Izard County buys the trailer a second time, but this second time, the county actually receives the trailer.”
In 2016, auditors discovered the trailer transaction was not approved by the Quorum Court, which is required for transactions with family members. Sherrell approached the court to approve the purchase of the trailer from Orf, which was done on August 2, 2016.
According to the arrest warrant, Matt Orf, age 39 of Oxford, has been charged with criminal use of property or laundering criminal proceeds, a class c felony, in connection with the sale of the trailer.
In June 2015, Sherrell purchased a pair of road graders from Stibling Equipment LLC, for the Izard County Road Department. The cost of the graders was $143,000 for a John Deere 670G, and $20,000 for a John Deere 670B. Neither the customer order or invoices were found in county records, they were given to investigators by Stribling, and were dated June 26, 2016. Found in county records was a fraudulent invoice, not created by Stribling, for the sale of a single road grader, 670G, to the county for $163,000. On July 2, 2015, Stribling salesman Paul Shuttleworth signed the fraudulent bill of sale in Sherrell’s office. The fraudulent bill of sale was located in county payment records. Sherrell presented the purchase of the 670G road grader for $163,000 to the Quorum Court and on July 6, 2015, the court approved financing. Sherrell never disclosed the acquisition of the 670B road grader to the court, or road department. Simons’ summary in the road grader investigation stated, “Izard County unwittingly pays for the 670B road grader and Sherrell takes unauthorized personal possession of the 670B road grader.” Almost a year and a half later, following Sherrell’s defeat in the November 2016 election, the 670B road grader appeared at the county road shop, in December 2016. It was never listed in the Road Department equipment inventory during Sherrell’s term of office. The hours of operation on the 670B road grader were 11,551 at the time of sale in June 2015, and 11,721 in December 2016.
Paul Shuttleworth, age 52 of Mountain View has been charged with forgery in the second degree, a class c felony, in connection with the purchase of the road graders.
In September 2016, Sherrell arranged to purchase a used Case 1150K bulldozer from Scott Equipment Company LLC, and on September 2, 2016, he took possession of the bulldozer, which was receipted as a demo. Sherrell signed a driver receipt which noted Izard County as the customer. He hauled the dozer to his personal farm and unloaded it. On September 12, 2016 Scott created a retail order form indicating Sherrell as the purchaser of the dozer, for the amount of $43,000. Sherrell’s signature appeared on the order. Scott subsequently billed Sherrell for $43,000, sent to his home address, on September 30 and October 17, 2016. Later, Scott invoiced Izard County in the amount of $58,000 for the dozer, indicating a base cost and additional cost of repairs at 15,000. Other information showed Sherrell had the dozer tracks replaced by his mechanic while at his farm. Additionally he paid a county employee out of his own pocket to work on the dozer on his property. Witnessess had seen Sherrell operating the dozer making improvements to his property. County Road Department employee Jesse Morgan picked up the dozer from Sherrell’s farm and returned it to Scott. On November 21, Scott issued an invoice to the county for $60,000, indicating the dozer had a new undercarriage, and noted that the $2,000 increase was due to Sherrell indicating that he wanted the air conditioning fixed. On December 6, 2016, the Quorum Court approved the purchase of the dozer. Another repair order dated December 29, 2016 in the amount of $3,285.34 from Scott, was paid by the county on January 11, 2017. The dozer was then delivered to the road department on January 23 with significant hydraulic issues. The dozer was never taken to the county road shop for use during Sherrell’s term in office.
In March 2015, Sherrell purchased miscellaneous tools and equipment for the Izard County Road Department, from Darren Bates, for the amount of $3,500. County employees accompanied Sherrell to pick up the tools and some of the equipment was dropped off at Sherrell’s farm, including a 100 gallon air compressor and assorted tools. Sherrell requested payment by Izard County to Bates for $3,500, and a check was issued on April 1, 2015. On May 31 of this year, a search warrant was served at the Sherrell residence by investigators with Arkansas State Police. Investigators recovered multiple items identified by Bates as having been purchased by Sherrell, for Izard County.
Sherrell, age 58 of Oxford, surrendered to authorities at the Izard County Jail in Melbourne on November 1, and was released on a $10,000 bond. Orf and Shuttleworth surrendered to authorities the next day and were released on their own recognizance.

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