The Municipal Recreation Improvement District, MRID, quarterly meetings for 2017 are, February 9, May 11, August 10, and November 9.
All meetings begin at 6:30 p.m. at the MRID building atop Turkey Mountain in Horseshoe Bend.

“North Arkansas Electric Cooperative’s phone system will be down Saturday, Feb. 11, while employees finish a system upgrade. Members still may make automated credit card payments by calling 844-335-4451 and may report an outage by calling 844-335-4461. We apologize for any inconvenience.”

TOTAL LOSS: The home of Robert and Joy Stephens of Oxford was destroyed by fire on February 8. Oxford and Franklin Fire Departments responded to the scene. No one was injured in the fire. The family of four lost everything in the fire, and donations for the family may be taken to Bailey’s Country Cookin in Melbourne, or Day’s Family Store in Oxford. A donation jar is set up at Jordan’s Kwik Stop and Red Mule in Melbourne. Immediate items needed are clothing in the following sizes, Mens shirt-2XL, pants 38-32; Women’s shirt XL; Boy size 12 shirt and pants; Girl size 10/12 shirts and pants; Girl 3T; Girl 9-12 month. Shoes needed are Girl, size 5 youth; Boy size 6 youth; Baby Girl size 7. Also needed immediately are Diapers size 3 and 4, Formula – Similac Advanced. Furnishings and household items are also needed. Photo/R.Sherrell

by Sharon VanZandt
Members and guests, join us for another busy month at the Loft! Every Tuesday Pool Tournaments begin at 6:30 p.m. Want to learn to line dance with a fun group? Join us every Thursday at 6 p.m.
Saturday, February 11 will be a real treat for our club! Entertainers Penny Wolfe, Erin Walters, Shannon Rounds and Eric Mallot will be singing and playing some great music for your listening or dancing pleasure. There is a $5 cover charge, you don’t want to miss this great night. Social hour begins at 6 p.m. with entertainment at 7 p.m.
Friday, February 17 will be our Fifth Annual Chili Cook-off! DJ Doctor Steve Clark will also be playing his great dancing music after the cook-off. See our ad in the Pacesetting Times classifieds for details. There will be no Potluck this month. Friday, February 24 will be our Birthday and Anniversary night. This month we will be celebrating both January and February. Sing along to Karaoke with the Slavins at 7 p.m. For more information contact the Loft at 870-670-4411. The Loft is located atop the Pro Shop on Turkey Mountain.

by Sue Clay
Join the Friends of Horseshoe Bend Animals for a “Fun-Raiser” Bowl for the Animals on Saturday, February 11 at 11 a.m. at Horseshoe Lanes. Teams need to be made up of four bowlers.
Fees are $20 per bowler with kids under 12 bowling for $10, and each team will receive a free pizza while bowling, provided by Scenic Realty.
There will be lots of prizes, drawings, and special awards.
The “Fun-Raiser” is a great way to spend time with good friends, and help the animals. Pick a theme for your team; choose a name, wear matching clothes, anything to stand out in the crowd and have a good time!
Area businesses and churches, please think about sponsoring a team. If you are not a bowler, sponsor a friend or a team. Sponsorships are only $5 for each bowler. If you want to bowl, but do not have a team, we can put one together for you.
The Friends Bake Sale, always the best goodies in town with lots of delicious choices, will also be going on at Horseshoe Lanes from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Stop in to buy your special Valentine treats for yourself and others. Come early for the best selection of goodies as the Friends Bake Sales are always a sellout.
If you have any questions, please phone Friends of HBA at 870-373-2649. If you would like to donate some baked goods, please have them at Horseshoe Lanes by 10:30 a.m. on that Saturday.
You can register your team at Horseshoe Lanes by phoning 870-670-5606. Please join the Friends of HBA and help the dogs and cats of Horseshoe Bend.

Gary Owens

When you’ve been in the shoe business for 61 years, you know what you’re doing. And let’s just say, Gary Owens of Union, knows his shoes.
Raised in Union, Gary began working for Noah Caruthers at the Salem Shoe Shop, when he was 11. He remembers running the shop alone for a week, at age 14, when Noah went on vacation. This job led Gary to Little Rock in 1966, where he worked for Snell Prosthetic Orthotics Lab until 2015. He remained there for 46 years. “There were five people employed there in the beginning, then 60 when I left, with ten labs. I was supervisor for all the labs,” he said. Gary built shoes, braces and orthopedic appliances until his retirement in February of 2015.
Gary and his wife Brenda opened Owens Corner Store in Union, a little over a year later, in June of 2016, and he has a workshop at the store, repairing shoes, saddles, purses and billfolds. He sells Cowtown boots at his shop as well. His slogan that can be seen on the storefront window is “Saving your sole so your boot can heel.”
Owens Corner Store is located on Hwy. 9, and they offer groceries, deli items, sandwiches, Hunt’s Brothers Pizza, wings and wingbites, ice, propane, and more. Gary and Brenda invite everyone to come by and have a free cup of coffee. The store is open Monday through Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is closed on Sunday.

Lady Cougars Champions at the Izard County Invitational Tournament
Photo/B.Stapleton

See full story and photos from the tournament in the February 8 edition of Pacesetting Times!

by Cassie Stafford
The National Court Appointed Special Advocate Association, together with its state and local member programs, supports and promotes court-appointed volunteer advocacy so every abused or neglected child in the United States can be safe, have a permanent home and the opportunity to thrive.
CASA volunteers in Sharp County are appointed by Judge Kevin King to watch over the child and be the eyes and ears for King. Volunteers must be age 21 and older, and attend a local training class and pass a background check.
Volunteers stay with each case until it is closed and the child is placed in a safe, permanent home. The advocate visits the child at least once a month to see how they are doing. The volunteer can interview the parents, foster parents, the schools, anyone that is involved in the child’s life.
Advocates have one or two cases tops, so that they can devote their time to the children and make sure their needs are being met. The advocate will then report back to the Coordinator.
The Coordinator then writes a court report. The advocate will go with the child to court and present the court report to the judge and speak for the child if needed.
“Basically, we are here to help out the child,” said April Garrett, Sharp County Coordinator. “We definitely need advocates, there are so many cases and right now we have seven advocates for Sharp County. They can only cover one to two cases each and there are probably close to 100 cases in Sharp County alone.”
Due to the lack of volunteers, there are a lot of children that need advocates that do not have them. An upcoming training meeting will be held in Pocahontas on February 17 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with lunch provided, and February 18 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., at First United Methodist Church, located at 400 North Thomasville Ave.
“When it’s possible, our main goal is to get the child back to their parents. We can talk with parents and encourage them and let them know of the different kinds of help they can get,” said Garrett.
Independent research has demonstrated that children with a CASA volunteer are substantially less likely to spend time in long-term foster care and less likely to re-enter care.

Travis Wilson


Following the arrest of a parole absconder by Fulton County deputies, the fugitive became belligerent.
Travis Wilson, age 38 of Viola, was arrested on a warrant from the Department of Corrections on Tuesday, January 31. According to Fulton County Sheriff Al Roork, Wilson was discovered at his residence hiding in a closet. Roork and Chief Deputy John Cawvey arrested Wilson without incident. He was placed in Deputy William Fawcett’s patrol car. Roork said, “Wilson was able to slip the cuffs from behind him and began destroying the interior of the patrol car.”
When Cawvey opened the rear door of the patrol car and removed Wilson, he hit Cawvey in the face. “Fawcett and Cawvey had an altercation with Wilson in an attempt to handcuff him a second time,” stated Roork. Both deputies and Wilson were taken to the Fulton County Hospital for treatment. Roork himself was kicked several times, but was not injured.
Wilson has been charged with parole absconder; two counts of second degree battery on a police officer, class a felonies; resisting arrest; criminal mischief, a class d felony; attempted escape, a class a felony; and criminal possession of body armor, a class d felony. He is incarcerated at the Fulton County Jail on a no-bond hold.
Wilson is scheduled to appear in Fulton County Circuit Court on Feb. 21, 2017.

North Arkansas Electric Cooperative’s phone system will be down for maintenance on Saturday, Feb. 4.
While the system is being upgraded, members still may make automated credit card payments by calling 844-335-4451, and may report an outage by calling 844-335-4461. NAEC apologizes for any inconvenience.

CLEANING UP: Prisoners from the Arkansas Department of Corrections North Central Unit in Calico Rock, were cleaning up the ditch lines along Lacrosse Road on Friday, January 20. Izard County Judge Eric Smith said he planned on having the prisoners clean up the roadway as long as he could. Photo/C.Stafford

CALLING ALL ARTISTS! OPEN STUDIO
Arts Center of North Arkansas (ACNA)
TUESDAY NIGHTS – FROM 5:30 TO 7:30 – JAN 31.
In the Cherokee Village Mall. Come join the fun –
Bring any project you’re interested in DRAWING – PAINTING – CRAFTING – QUILTING – SCRAPBOOKING – EMBROIDERY…..
Learn, laugh, experiment, visit, share, see what others are doing, enjoy. Bring your own supplies, drinks, snacks – hot chocolate sounds good. Contact – Marty Williams – 870-257-5661 – for more information.
The Arts Center will be closed during inclement weather.

by Ron Yow
The January Music in the Mountains Show will be held on Saturday, January 28.
Normally the show is on the third Saturday but we have had to change the date. Be sure and mark your calendar of this change! Our guests for the January show are a couple of locals.
A few months ago, The Loft held a singing contest with some very talented singers.
We were able to get the first and second place winners to come and perform with us, Randy Campbell and Kelly Smith.
Campbell is a local who grew up up Franklin. He has been singing since he was able to speak and loves country music.
Smith lives right here in Horseshoe Bend and is best known around town as the Animal Control Officer. Smith is a very talented singer and enjoys singing a wide array of music.
This is a show you will not want to miss. So remember the date, January 28. The doors will open at 5 p.m. with Marty McKnight cooking hot dogs and hamburgers on the grill. The girls will be inside to help with your hunger needs.
The show will begin at 6 p.m. Come on out for an evening of good food, good fellowship and lots of good music. Admission is by donation.
We want to thank our corporate sponsor, FNBC, for their continued support. Hope to see you all Saturday, January 28.

Royalty at the Izard County Consolidated Homecoming on Friday, January 13 at Brockwell. Photo/B.Stapleton

A Violet Hill woman and her two children were arrested January 13 during ICC’s Homecoming Basketball game at the Brockwell campus.
Izard County Sgt. Mark Simino was approached by Kristen Lynn Hennigan, age 32, who stated that her daughter had been victimized previously at the school. Simino reported that school officials had addressed the situation but Hennigan was not satisfied with the action taken. At that time, he directed Hennigan to School Resource Officer Bret Stephenson.
A short time later, Simino observed Stephenson conversing with the mother and two juveniles. Hennigan and her children were directed to the south side of the lobby near the entrance by school staff.
She was exhibiting extreme agitation and was thrusting her hands and arms about in a protesting manner, according to the incident report.
Simino was summoned by school officials to again assist with the family, who had been directed to leave the building because of their public display of inappropriate outbursts, and their threatening actions toward another student. They refused to comply with the direction to leave the building.
The male juvenile, age 13, attempted to prevent Simino from physically directing Hennigan out of the building, and the female juvenile, age 12, was yelling at officers. Hennigan continued to obstruct the actions of the officer, and was yelling and escalating the situation.
A physical confrontation by Hennigan and her children led to the arrest of all three. A physical struggle with the mother and the juveniles continued as the three were removed from the building by Simino, Stephenson and Probation and Parole Officer Ryan Walker.
When the male juvenile was placed in the patrol car, he shattered the passenger side rear window and continued to yell out threats and insults toward the deputies.
The juveniles were each charged with disorderly conduct and the male juvenile was additionally charged with criminal mischief. Both were transported to the Juvenile Detention Facility in Batesville. Hennigan was charged with disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and contributing to the delinquency of a minor.
She was transported to the Izard County Detention Facility where she remains in lieu of $3,800 bond,and has a court date of February 19.

(January 25, 2017)

JoAnn Lowrie
Photo/C.Stafford


by Cassie Stafford
JoAnn Lowrie is retiring after 22 years working with the Head Start and NADC programs in Salem.
Lowrie began working at Head Start in 1992 and worked until 1998. She then took a few year’s break and had her own in-home daycare, and then she returned to “the front side of the building” as she called it. In 2000, she began in the Management position at NADC in Fulton County.
Lowrie was born in Salem in 1962 and graduated from Highschool in 1980. She then moved to Little Rock and started college. While in Little Rock, she attended a Jr. College and also UALR. She met her husband and married him in 1981, had two boys, Robert and James, and moved back to Salem in 1990 when Robert started kindergarten. She received her Child Development Associate license at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro.
In 1991 the Head Start Program was a home based program, and in 1992, the program was going to center based. “It was a threat that Salem wouldn’t have a Head Start program because they couldn’t find a building,” said Lowrie. With her son, James, being in the program and being a Head Start parent at the time, Lowrie thought, “We can’t just let these kids be dropped.” Lowrie began to help look around for a building and talked to Cord Mosley who owned the property that the Head Start program is in. Head Start opened the center in December of 1992 and Lowrie served as the Assistant Teacher.
Looking back on what she enjoyed most in the 22 years, Lowrie said, “Head Start will always be in my heart, because just watching the kids when they would master tying their shoes, or being able to count to ten. Those little milestones and that little lightbulb would go off, and their face and their little eyes lit up. It would just be awesome.” She also enjoyed working with the parents because they would also set goals for the parents to obtain. “Just being involved in that family was a big plus.”
Lowrie also really enjoyed the Energy Assistance Program. “Our elderly and handicapped live on such a small income, sometimes it makes a difference in eating or medicine.” Lowrie explained that over the years, she has seen some people that are “too proud” to ask for help, but that she encourages people who need the help to take advantage of it, that way they can afford their medicine and food.
She explained that another aspect that she loved about the job was being able to refer people. Sometimes people call and just don’t know where to turn, so Lowrie tries to find the help that they need. Even if NADC is out of funds, she tries to lead people in the right direction they need to be in, and give them that little bit of hope. At times, when funds have been tight, she had to cover two counties. In 2016, Lowrie covered Fulton and Izard County and had to split four days between the two counties.
“I think God put me here, in this job, I really do,” said Lowrie. “Growing up, we didn’t always have the money, so I understand. It’s not an embarrassment to need the help, but if you don’t ask you can’t get it.”
Lowrie said something that has impressed her the past few years is that Fulton County Judge Darrell Zimmer has been the only Judge that she knows of that has helped unload the commodity truck. “It amazes me that he always stands in there and is in the assembly line unloading the boxes.”
After retirement, Lowrie said her main goal right now is to get her husband well, who has been dealing with some health issues since December 2016. “The main thing is just to be there for him. I also have four beautiful grandchildren; Peyton, Alex, Brooklyn and Jace.” Lowrie is looking forward to just being able to spend some time with her grandchildren outdoors. “They all love to be outdoors,” she said.
Lowrie loves scrapbooking and sewing. She has put her scrapbooking on hold lately, but said she’s ready to get back to it. “To me that’s sort of preserving the history of our family, plus the kids love it,” she said.
She commended Linda Cooper, who has been with NADC for over 40 years, for the good job that she does. “With her vision, this program has really grown. I thank her for giving me the opportunity to start. I appreciate the clients letting me be here in their time of need.”
Libby Hale, who began working at Head Start as a Health and Safety Aide in Fall 2016, was hired on Monday, January 17 to fill Lowrie’s vacant position. The Fulton County office will be open Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Attention all men! Are you a hunk in heels?
The Salem Fifth Grade Class is hosting a Woman-less Beauty Pageant to raise money for the Nathan Jackson family. The pageant will be held at the Salem High School on January 28 at 6 p.m.
The pageant entry fee is $10. Winners will be crowned by donations. This will be a fun event for a great cause. If you would like to enter the pageant or help with the show, please contact Heather Busch at 870-291-1087 or Tiffany Cooper at 870-371-4054.
There will also be a dessert auction (pie, cakes, cookies, cinnamon rolls, etc). If you would like to bake a sweet treat, it would be greatly appreciated.

(January 25, 2017)

North Central Unit, Arkansas Department of Corrections, Calico Rock. Photo/B.Stapleton


by Karen Sherrell
A public meeting was held last November by the Arkansas Department of Corrections North Central Unit, NCU, at Calico Rock.
Prison officials spoke to the residents attending about the various programs at the local facility, such as education, regional maintenance, horse operation, Substance Abuse Education, Canine Unit, garden and forage production, PAL Program, Pre-Release Program, and Paws in Prison Program.
It was reported at the meeting that a potential expansion at the NCU is under consideration, with a plan to house an additional 500 inmates.
The NCU was established in 1990 and employs 179. Described as a medium to minimum security facility, NCU houses, on the average, 840 inmates, or full capacity.
According to Solomon Graves, Public Information Officer and Legislative Liaison with the ADC, in August of 2016, ADC Director Wendy Kelley asked the Board of Corrections for their approval of her to request for funding to expand the North Central Unit at Calico Rock. The Arkansas Board of Corrections is comprised of seven members appointed by the Governor.
The request provided for 576 additional beds at the NCU with an additional 30 Administrative Segregation beds, along with additional Administration and Support Staff offices and programming spaces. The projected size of the expansion is 88,442 sq. ft. and projected cost is $39,283,655.
According to the 2018/19 Capital Projects Request report, eight prison projects throughout the state, including the NCU request, have been submitted to the Board of Corrections, totalling $52,064,199.
In August of 2016, reports stated that the ADC is looking to ease the overcrowding issue in the state’s prison system, with the Board of Corrections asking the governor to approve the expansion of 576 beds at the NCU in Calico Rock.
No projected date of the approval of expansion has been announced.
A report on prison and jail population increases, and specialty courts to ease overcrowding, will be published in next week’s edition.

A meeting will be held on Thursday, August 11 in the community room at the Horseshoe Bend Area Chamber of Commerce, to discuss long-term care insurance, facilities, and other related topics.
Alex Hicks will give details on long-term care insurance, and Cindy Wildhagen will highlight long-term care facilities. A question and answer session will be held.
Refreshments will be available and the meeting will be 10 a.m. to noon. The chamber office is located at 707 Third Street, Horseshoe Bend. Everyone is invited to come, listen, and ask questions at this informative meeting.

by Karen Sherrell
IZARD COUNTY — A few candidates have filed for municipal office since the opening day of July 29.
In Horseshoe Bend, Tom Richardson, appointed incumbent, has filed for Alderman, Ward 2, Position 2; and Michelle Grabowski, incumbent, has filed for Recorder/Treasurer.
In Calico Rock, Fredrick Blickle has filed for Alderman, Ward 4, Position 1.
In Melbourne, Alecia Bray, incumbent, has filed for Recorder/Treasurer; and Sonia Blankenship has filed for Alderman, Ward 4, Position 2.
Filings for municipal office include candidates for Recorder/Treasurer and City Council, to be voted on during the General Election, November 8.
Candidates need to file petitions of nomination, an affidavit of eligibility, and a political practices pledge with the county clerk of their residency. Friday, August 19 at noon is the deadline to file for office.
Annual school board elections will be held September 20. Deadline to register to vote in the school board election is Monday, August 22.

A trash truck ended up on its side in the curve by Morriston Road on Hwy. 289 on Monday, August 1 around 5 p.m. The Franklin Fire Department assisted in directing traffic as Skeeter Beene Towing of Melbourne pulled the truck back upright. No injuries were reported. Arkansas State Police Trooper Villiger worked the wreck. Photo/C.Stafford

Rollover on Hwy. 289 between Horseshoe Bend and Glencoe

Rollover on Hwy. 289 between Horseshoe Bend and Glencoe

Over 200 new students participated in orientation at Ozarka College in Mammoth Spring and Ash Flat on August 2, and in Mountain View and Melbourne on August 3. A make-up session for the required new student orientation will be held at 6 p.m. on August 11 at the Melbourne campus.

Ozarka College’s fall semester will begin on August 15, but it is not too late to get registered for fall classes. The College is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and staff members are available to assist you with completing an application for admissions, applying for financial aid, getting advised and registered for classes, enrolling in student service programs, and anything else to help you succeed.

Ozarka College, committed to YOUR success. For more information, please call 870.368.2024 or email: admisssions@ozarka.edu. Additional information is also available at www.ozarka.edu.

Kaylee Jo Guthrie of Melbourne, has been crowned as the 2016 Miss Arkansas National Teenager.
She was chosen based on academic scores, community service and leadership abilities. Now she will be competing for America’s National Teenager title.
The American National Teenage Scholarship Organization draws on a positive side of pageantry that focuses on a real girl not just her appearance. “It is an honor to be able to represent the beautiful State of Arkansas and the many wonderful people that live here. I would like to thank the many friends and family who have helped me grow up and shaped me into the person I have become today. Please join me on my journey,” said Kaylee Jo.
Kaylee Jo has been a member of 4-H, and for the past seven years she has been keeping a journal of the time, sweat, blood, and energy that has been spent doing 4-H related activities.
“I have kept track of hours used for various projects, money lost and gained with raising/showing animals, and time spent helping shape others around me. This was the first year I was able to compete in the 4-H State Record Book competition and I conquered my challenge,” she said. This year Kaylee Jo won in the Utilizing Science and Technology field with her Veterinarian Science project. “I encourage all youth to set and work toward a goal and give it everything you’ve got because eventually it will pay off,” said Kaylee Jo.
For Kaylee Jo it paid off big. “I will be receiving a $1,500 scholarship to the college of my choice, plus a trip to National Congress in Atlanta, GA in November,” she said.
Community-minded young lady

Kaylee Jo Guthrie

Kaylee Jo Guthrie


Kaylee Jo was able to represent three different organizations with one trip to Blanchard Springs Caverns in March. She was able to make a public appearance and spread the word about America’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization. As a member of the Izard County Drug and Tobacco Coalition, she picked up cigarette butts around the park and educated others on the dangers of tobacco. As a 4-H’er she used her leadership abilities in team building activities. Above all else, she set a positive example for others to follow and wore her beautiful smile all day long.
“I had an amazing day at Blanchard Springs Caverns with close to 100 4-H’ers from several different counties. We went on the Dripstone Cave tour, picked up cigarette butts at the park, went on a hike, learned about water pollution, and made ice cream in a bag. I was glad I was given the opportunity to represent three major organizations in my life, 4-H, ANTSO, and the Izard County Drug Coalition team. I really enjoyed leading some of the group activities and setting a good example for those around me,” said Kaylee Jo.
ANTSO stands for American’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization and is the organization in which Kaylee Jo represents the State of Arkansas. This is the 46th year for ANTSO and is currently directed by Jenny Telar. ANTSO represents all 50 states and offers young ladies a pageantry that weighs heavily on academics, community service, and leadership abilities.
The 2016 America’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization pageant will be held July 26 through August 1.
Kayle Jo stated, “As many of you know I will be competing for America’s National Teenager. One of the awards given is People’s Choice, the girl with the most likes and views on her video wins. I would really appreciate if you would open this link, watch my video, like it and then share it with your friends. Thank you all so much for all the support and encouragement I have received from all of you along the way.” Kaylee Jo’s video may be viewed at https://youtu.be/yBLpPgGW_rI. The more likes Kaylee Jo receives on her video, the more likely she is to win People’s Choice.
America’s National Teenager is the longest running premier pageant for teens in the United States. Founded in 1970, America’s National Teenager has graced the cover of magazines, television and national media as a role model of leadership, scholastic aptitude and service. Combining the elements of glamour, scholarship, style and service, ANTSO State and National Programs draw on a positive approach to pageantry that implements a scoring system focusing on a “real girl”. With no swimsuit or mandatory talent competition, ANTSO focuses on a typical teen in daily life. Contestants are judged in five categories: 30% Interview, 15% Evening Gown, 15% Personal Expression (contestants decorate a pair of blue jeans and model them, a trademarked category of ANTSO), 15% School (academics and school awards/excellence), 15% Activities (leadership, extra-curricular activities and community service), 10% Onstage Question.
ANTSO has awarded more than $102 million scholarships since its creation. America’s National Teenager continues to set high standards for excellence by awarding nearly $100,000 in scholarships at every state competition each year.
All National and State winners are awarded in-kind scholarships from sponsoring universities and the opportunity to serve as positive role models to teens across America. ANTSO holds to the highest standards of quality and integrity and conducts all competitions in a fair and unbiased manner.

skidmoreSavannah Skidmore (r), 21-year old daughter of Jerry and Kim Skidmore of Calico Rock and a junior at the University of Arkansas, was selected as first runner-up in the 79th Annual Miss Arkansas Scholarship Pageant at Bank of the Ozarks Arena in Hot Springs recently. The pageant featured 42 contestants from the state of Arkansas. The girls competed for $121,800 in scholarship funds. Skidmore received a $10,000 scholarship sponsored by Charles and Susie Morgan for being chosen as first runner-up in the competition. Skidmore tied with Savvy Shields, Miss Heart of the Ozarks, in Lifestyle and Fitness in Swimsuit, and was awarded a $1,000 scholarship. Pictured (l to r) is Shields; Reigning Miss Arkansas, and Top 15 Miss America Semi-Finalist, Loren McDaniel; Preliminary Artistic Expression in Talent award winner, Miss North Central Arkansas Rebecca Zurcher; and Skidmore.
Photo/Ashley George

franksDanny Franks, age 39 of Blytheville, formerly of Melbourne, remains at large following a July 12 call to Fairview Street in Melbourne, in reference to a domestic violence complaint.
As Cpl. Richard Williams was responding, dispatch advised the officer that the alleged perpetrator had left the residence driving a small tan Toyota truck. Cpl. Williams attempted to initiate a traffic stop. Franks sped away and continued to Lacrosse Road, then west of Highway 56 to Johnsonview Road. He then abandoned the vehicle and fled on foot. Deputies were unable to locate Franks, and his vehicle was towed and impounded.
On July 13, a Johnsonview Road resident reported that his truck was missing. Investigators learned that Franks was residing in Blytheville and a BOLO was issued on the stolen vehicle.
Mississippi County authorities advised local authorities that the stolen truck had been located by a farmer in a cornfield. They further advised that no one was in or near the truck and that the vehicle engine was still running.
Franks remains at large. Anyone having knowledge of his whereabouts is asked to contact the Sheriff’s Department at 870-368-4203.

On Sunday, June 12, Weston Burk, son of Joey and Cassi Burk of Salem and brother to Natalie, was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, ALL. He is undergoing treatments at Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock. The entire community of Salem has pulled together for the Burk Family. Several fundraisers and raffles have been established. The Weston Burk Co-Ed Benefit Tournament was held last weekend.
Event coordinator Lena Smith of Salem stated, “I believe good things come to good people and you won’t find a better family than the Burks!”
Over $7,000 was raised on July 9 and July 10 during the tournament (t-shirts, raffles, entry fees, concessions and donations).
“Wow what a great showing of support, prayer, and fellowship at Salem yesterday. The Weston Co-ed Tournament was a huge success. Thank you to all 19 teams that stuck it out and worked throughout the day switching fields and keeping things on track and going. Thanks everyone that participated and helped with it all. I’m very glad to be a part of it and help bring it all together. What an incredible community we live in!” stated event coordinator Jake Smith of Salem.
“Today has just been absolutely amazing! Joey and I tried to make it around to everyone that came out to the tournament, but we know we missed some. So we are trying to reach out to everyone to tell you all how THANKFUL we are for everything. To the 19 teams that played, the umps, scorekeepers, concession stand workers, all the sponsors that donated food or money, the community that came out just to watch the games or eat, and to all the ones that had a helping hand in putting it all together, thank you. We know it was not an easy job and took a lot of hard work and time. We are so blessed to call you all our friends and family. Thank you again for everything you have done for our little boy and family, we love you all!” said Cassi Burk.
Sponsors of the Weston Burk Co-Ed Benefit Tournament were Sonic of Salem, Twin Lakes Packing and Processing, Town and Country of Ash Flat, Modern Woodmen – Trena Spears, Barker’s Funeral Home, Scribner’s Family Practice, Viola Hardware, Barker’s Hilltop Package Store, Janice Hensley and family, Salem Sweet Treats and Bakery, Cliff and Cheryl Pleasant, Gary Wayne and Lenisa Branscum, Terry Burk and North Arkansas Electic Cooperative. The Dirt Bags from Mt. Grove, Missouri, took first place in the tournament.dirtbags-001

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A woman was assaulted outside her home on Wednesday, July 13, located on Hwy. 9 South in Fulton County.
According to the Fulton County Sheriff’s Office, the woman, in her late 60s, was attacked by a white or hispanic male, while she was working in her yard. The victim never heard the man approach, and was assaulted from behind as the attacker attempted to strangle her with a rope around her neck. According to authorities, the woman was able to fight her attacker by kicking him and he fled the scene.
The woman received treatment at a local hospital. Fulton County authorities and the Arkansas State Police are investigating the assault.

The 26th Annual Buddy Bass Tournament on April 16 will benefit the Friends of Horseshoe Bend Animals.
Held on 640 acre Crown Lake in Horseshoe Bend, the tournament is being presented by Box Hound Marina, Resort, and R.V. Park. Box Hound Marina will be the headquarters and host for the event.
Tournament hours are from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Entry fees will be $60 per boat (two person maximum in boat). There will be an optional Big Bass entry of $5 per person. Drawings for door prizes are held after the official weigh in. All proceeds from the entries will be donated to Friends of Horseshoe Bend Animals. Since 2013, the Buddy Bass tournament has raised $6,000 to help their cause.
Call 870-670-4496 for more information.

The Arkansas Spring Nationals racing event will be held at Batesville Motor Speedway on Friday, March 25 and Saturday, March 26.
ICMA Modifieds and Street Stock will race, ICMA sanctioned National, State and Track Points. There is no entry fee.
Total purse for both days is $23,000. For ICMA Mods, there is $1,000 to win; for Street Stock, there is also $1,000 to win.
Pit gates open at 4 p.m. each day; hot laps start at 7 p.m.; races start at 7:30 p.m.; pit passes $30 each day.
Grandstands open at 5:30 p.m. with an admission of $10 each day; kids 14 and under are free.
Batesville Motor Speedway is located at 5090 Heber Springs Road, Locust Grove, AR 72550; seven miles west of Batesville. Call the track for more information at 870-251-0011; for promotions and tickets, call 870-613-1337. Visit BMS website at www.batesvillemotorspeedway.net or email them at csstarr2@yahoo.com.

The Awakening Revival
On Saturday, March 26, The Awakening Revival will be held on the Holy Mountain, the highest peak in Horseshoe Bend, Turkey Mountain. Prayer begins at 5 p.m. and the revival will begin at 7 p.m.

Easter Cantata
Horseshoe Bend First Baptist Church choir will present the Easter Cantata, Behold the Lamb by Lloyd Larson on Easter Sunday afternoon, March 27 at 4 p.m. The public is invited to end this special day with a musical and narrative journey celebrating God’s priceless gift. A finger food fellowship will follow the performance. First Baptist Church is located at 511 West Church Street.

Easter Sunrise Service
Continuing with the tradition, Reverend David Schaller of Faith Presbyterian Church in Horseshoe Bend will present a Sunrise Service on Easter morning at 6:45 a.m. at Turkey Mountain tennis courts. Everyone is invited to celebrate and share in this Spiritual event. Please bring your chair. Afterwards, coffee and donuts are provided at Faith Presbyterian Church. In the event of rain, the service will be held at the church.

Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church, Horseshoe Bend
March 27 – The Resurrection of our Lord, Free Easter Breakfast starting at 7:30 a.m. Festive Divine Service with Holy Communion 9 a.m. “Come to the Feast” – Amos 9:11-15.

Pacesetting Times placed second in the coveted Sweepstakes Division in the 2016 Arkansas Press Association’s Better Newspaper Advertising Contest.
The state convention awards luncheon was held on Friday, March 11 at the Winrock Rockefeller Institute located at Petit Jean Mountain, with 90 members of the press association in attendance. Publisher Karen Sherrell and husband Randy attended, along with Graphic Designer Carrie Johnson, and Tyler Trivitt.
Pacesetting Times won 12 awards; four first place, three second place, and five third place, to garner the second place Sweepstakes Award.
The newspaper’s first place awards and judge’s comments were:
Best Single Ad, Half Page and Over, Horseshoe Bend Goes Pink, Carrie Johnson, “Creative design;”
Best Single Supplement Ad, Taylor Hearing, Johnson, “The green is effective and ties in with the photo on the page;”
Best Use of Process Color, Southfork River Therapy, Johnson and Karen Sherrell, “Good use of color;”
Most Original Idea, The Buck Stops Here, Sherrell and Johnson, “This is what newspaper advertising is all about, getting people in the store, not a pass by ad, well done.”
Second place awards were:
Best Automotive Classified Ad, Mark Martin Chevrolet-Ash Flat Give Thanks, Johnson and Sherrell; “Great use of color, really great ad layout, clean ad;”
Best Single Ad, Over 10” Under Half Page, Independence County Off Road, Johnson and Sherrell;
Best Festival-Special Event Ad, Dogwood Days Festival; Sherrell and Johnson, “For a festival ad, this really takes the cake. Bold, bright, nice promotional ad, a real eye catcher.”
Third place awards were:
Best Single Ad, Half Page and Over, ARcare, Friendly Faces, Johnson and Sherrell;
Best Single Ad, Over 10” Under Half Page, Sonshine Shoppe, Johnson and Sherrell;
Best Single Supplement Ad, ARcare, Johnson;
Best use of Original Photo, McClung Equipment, Farm Family, Johnson;
Most Original Idea, Tips from a Professional, Sherrell and Johnson.
Members of the Nebraska Press Association selected winners from 12 daily newspapers submitting 448 entries, and 17 weekly newspapers submitting 323 entries.
“We appreciate our customers and subscribers for making this all possible in the first place,” said Karen Sherrell, publisher. “I am so proud of our hard working staff, not only for a job well done and going the extra mile, but for the great customer service they provide.”

The Ministerial Alliance of Calico Rock announced Holy Week services will be held daily at noon from March 21 through 25. Services will feature music and and the ministry of God’s Word by local pastors. Lunch will be provided following the services, which will be held at the United Methodist Church, 1611 Hwy. 56 in Calico Rock. Easter Sunday, March 27, Sunrise Service will be held at the water tower on the bluffs overlooking the White River at 6:30 a.m. weather permitting. Otherwise, the service will be held at the Calico Rock Cumberland Presbyterian Church, 1007 Hwy. 56.

Fulton County local results
Treasurer
Seth Jones 815, 57.39%
Boyd Dailey 605, 42.61%

Coroner
Steven C. Barker 818, 58.64% Melissa James 577, 41.36%

Sharp County local results
Judge
Dustin Rogers 583, 63.78%
Phillip D. Hood 330, 36.22%

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Arkansans statewide are encouraged to spruce up their communities by volunteering in the Keep America Beautiful Great American Cleanup in Arkansas. This year’s spring cleanup campaign, coordinated and promoted by the Keep Arkansas Beautiful Commission, KAB, begins March 1 and continues through May 31.
Everyone in Horseshoe Bend is encouraged to participate in this year’s Keep Horseshoe Bend Beautiful Great American Cleanup. Civic groups, clubs, organizations, scouts, churches, individuals, businesses, and neighborhoods can put together a volunteer crew and pitch in on May 7 and help cleanup. There will be a Hot Dog Picnic to follow. All Horseshoe Benders are encouraged to take part in the annual community cleanup initiative.
Those interested in organizing a cleanup event or volunteering, please call Event Coordinators Michelle Grabowski, City Hall, at 870-670-5113; or Carrie Johnson, Pacesetting Times, at 870-670-6397.
“The Great American Cleanup is an excellent opportunity for Arkansans to make a positive impact on the environment, the state and their local communities,” said Elizabeth Philpott, KAB volunteer program manager. “We encourage everyone to participate in a local event or sign up to coordinate an event.”
Horseshoe Bend is an attractive community, and all residents have a responsibility to keep it clean and attractive. If Horseshoe Bend is littered and ill kept, its potential to attract industry and tourism can be greatly impacted.
A fresh coat of paint, a few new flower plantings, roadsides and waterways free of litter can make a big difference in Horseshoe Bend’s future.
Below are some of the things you can do as a church, business, or civic group to be a sponsor.
– Freshen up your parking lot, roadsides, and ditches;
– Plant a flower bed;
– Add potted flowers or plants to your entrance;
– Recycle Items produced by your church, business, or civic group that are accepted by Horseshoe Bend Recycling Center;
– Prune trees and bushes;
– Add a fresh coat of paint if needed;
– Put together a volunteer crew and pitch in on May 7.
Updated information on where volunteers will meet to sign up and what supplies volunteers will need to bring will be published in the Pacesetting Times as we get closer to the clean-up date.
KAB works with cleanup coordinators to plan and publicize their local events, and provide volunteers with Glad® trash bags, gloves, safety vests and other cleanup supplies.

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The Pacesetting Times in Horseshoe Bend is having their Fourth Annual Photo Contest for amateur photography. The deadline for turning pictures in is February 29. There are three categories in this contest.
The first category is Scenery. Do you have a picture that you think is just the prettiest scene ever? Send it in to the paper! Arkansas is The Natural State, and has several beauties!
The second category is Special Moments. This includes pictures of children, for one of those moments that is “just too cute.”
The third category is Animal Lovers. Send in your pictures that are perfect of your pets or any other animal.
The three categories will each have one winner and will receive a prize. The pictures will be judged and the winner from each category will be announced in the March 9 issue of Pacesetting Times. We ask that each family submit only one photo per category.
Each photo submitted will be published in Pacesetting Times intermittently. In order to successfully enter the contest, you must send your name, age, phone number, and a brief description of your picture along with your photo.
You can enter the contest via email at pacesetting@centurytel.net, via mail Pacesetting Times, P.O. Box 132, Franklin, AR, 72536, or drop by our office at 703 S. Bend Drive in Horseshoe Bend. The Pacesetting Times reserves the right to refuse inappropriate photography.

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The Pacesetting Times Christmas edition is this week, December 23. Grab yourself a copy of the paper and enjoy Letters to Santa, greetings from area businesses, Christmas Parade and Santa photos, and much more!

A Guion woman was killed Wednesday, November 25 in a single-vehicle crash east of Mountain View.
The Arkansas State Police reported 68-year-old Jennetta McNealy died when her vehicle failed to negotiate a curve, ran off the roadway, collided with a ditch and overturned on State Highway 14.
The accident was investigated by Corp. Brandon J. Cook.

Thelma Clara Blevins Montgomery, daughter of the late Jonathan Blevins and Minnie Bell Pearson Blevins, was born October 13, 1918 in Violet Hill, Arkansas. She departed this life November 24, 2015 in Mountain Home, Arkansas at the age of 97 years, 1 month and 11 days. She was united in marriage to Eathel Montgomery April 4, 1942 in Knob Creek, Arkansas and to this union three daughters were born. She spent her life as a loving daughter, sister, wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, great great grandmother, homemaker and friend. During her working years she was employed as a restaurant cook. She was of the Baptist faith and a long time member of Fairview Baptist Church in Violet Hill, Arkansas.
She is survived by three daughters and two sons-in-law: Barbara Womack of Gassville, Donita K and Max Williams of Brockwell and Bonita Faye and Lonnie Neal of Viola; eight grandchildren: Ronnie Womack, Kristine Davis, Shawn Womack, Penny Vandergriff, Rita Newman, Wayne Neal, Ginger Harris and Daniel Neal; 22 great grandchildren; 5 great great grandchildren and a host of other relatives and many good friends.She was preceeded in death by her parents, her husband: Eathel Montgomery; four brothers: Preston Blevins, Clarence Blevins, Ewing Blevins, Hancel Blevins; six sisters: Mary Reynolds, Martha Reed, Elsie Jennings, Virgie Tarvin, Ester Thompson and Alta Bookout Smith; one son-in-law: Roger Womack.
Visitation will be Saturday, November 28, 2015 from 12 noon until 2:00 p.m. at Eddie’s Family Funeral Home in Melbourne, AR. Funeral service will begin at 2:00 p.m. with Ken Vest officiating. Burial will be at Violet Hill Cemetery under the direction of Eddie’s Family Funeral Home.
Pallbearers: Ronnie Womack, Shawn Womack, Wayne Neal, Daniel Neal, James Newman and Bryan Harris. Honorary Pallbearers: Kristine Davis, Penny Vandergriff, Rita Newman, Ginger Harris, Melinda Womack and Denise Neal

The Oxford City Council met November 2 and approved the purchase of a rescue vehicle by the Oxford Fire Department.
The meeting began at 7 p.m. with all council members present, along with Mayor Greg Stuart and Recorder/Treasurer Bonnie Moss.
Stuart reported on a possible purchase of a 2006 4×4 Chevy one ton. Fire Chief Alan Estes was unable to attend the meeting.
“The vehicle has work boxes on the sides and can haul a 350 gallon polytank,” said Stuart. The vehicle cost is $16,000 and is for sale at Campbell’s Auto Sales in Melbourne. “The fire department has $10,000 that can be used for the purchase, and still leave money in their account. They can borrow the remainder and make payments,” said Stuart. Councilman Billy McBride made a motion to approve the purchase of the vehicle by the fire department, seconded by Councilwoman Amy Stevenson. All council members unanimously approved the purchase.
Stuart told the council that a Rural Services Block Grant was available for up to $75,000, with a 10% match, that could be used for renovating the fire station, vehicles, equipment, protective clothing and other items. This grant would have to be submitted by an official grant writer. Council asked Stuart to find out costs associated with the grant, before pursuing the grant as an option to defray the cost of the vehicle.
Street and Water Reports were given by Superintendent Micah Walker. City workers have fixed two leaks, finished the Aquiar project, painted the pavilion at the city park, and cleaned and painted the concession stand. Minor repairs were done on nine sewer calls, and the sewer program is continuing. Walker reported he is waiting for the ground to settle at the culvert project on Campground Road, with more repair to the area. The new replacement fire hydrant has been received to be installed between Whispering Pines and Green Acres.

State Senator Linda Collins-Smith will be the featured speaker at the Spring River Chamber of Commerce meeting on Tuesday, November 17 at noon at the HaHoo Mongolian Grill in Hardy. Guests are welcome to attend this meeting. For more information call the Chamber office 870-856-3210 or email sracc@centurytel.net.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) has announced that the remains of a serviceman, missing from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be buried with full military honors.
Army Maj. Dale W. Richardson of Mount Sterling, Illinois, will be buried Aug. 29, in Mountain View, Ark.
Richardson was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 34th Armor Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, and was the passenger aboard an UH-1H Iroquois (Huey) helicopter that was en route to Fire Support Base Katum, South Vietnam, when it was diverted due to bad weather. After flying into Cambodian airspace, the aircraft came under heavy enemy ground fire, causing the pilot to make an emergency landing in Kampong Cham Province, Cambodia. The Huey’s four crewmen and its four passengers survived the landing. Richardson died at the site of the crash during a fire fight with enemy forces. His remains were not recovered.
For 16 years, joint U.S./Cambodian teams investigated the site without success. On Feb. 18, 2009, a joint team interviewed witnesses in the Memot District of Cambodia who claimed to have information on the loss. The witnesses identified a possible burial site for the unaccounted for servicemen. The team excavated the burial site but was unsuccessful locating the remains.
From Jan. 16, 2010 to March 11, 2011, joint U.S./Cambodian teams excavated the area, but were unsuccessful recovering the crewman’s remains.
In February 2012, another joint U.S./Cambodian team re-interviewed two of the witnesses. The witnesses identified a secondary burial site near the previously excavated site. The team excavated the secondary burial site and recovered human remains and military gear from a single grave.
In the identification of Richardson, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) analyzed circumstantial evidence and used forensic identification tools, to include mitochondrial DNA, which matched his sister.
MAJ Richardson’s remains are scheduled to arrive at Little Rock, on Thursday, August 27, and be escorted to Mountain View. Funeral services will be held Saturday, August 29, at 2 p.m. at Flatwoods Missionary Baptist Church in Mountain View. Borne by U.S. Army pallbearers, Dale will be accorded full military honors and interred near his parents in Flatwoods Cemetery.richardson
Today there are 1,627 American service members that are still unaccounted for from the Vietnam War.

Staff members of the Pacesetting Times won seven state awards in the recent Better Newspaper News-Editorial Contest conducted annually by the Arkansas Press Association.
In the Smaller Weekly Division, Coverage of Education Category, Karen Sherrell, Carrie Johnson and Cassie Stafford won Second Place. Judges comments were, “Dedicated page for education news, what a great thing for your readers; good variety of topics.” Sherrell and Johnson won Third Place for Best Front Page, and Sherrell placed third for her News Story, “One Year Later” about a tornado hitting Horseshoe Bend. Judges comments were, “Good photos to illustrate article.” Johnson received Third Place for a Single Feature Photograph, “Good things come in twos.”
Stafford received an Honorable Mention for her Single Sports Feature Photograph “Salem Teammates” and Bobby Stapleton received Honorable Mentions for Sports News Story, “Greyhounds battle Panthers” and Single Sports Action Photograph “Putting on a show.”
“I’m so proud of our staff and their hard work recognized by the Press Association,” said Sherrell, owner of the newspaper. “It’s wonderful when everybody wins!”
This year 55 Arkansas newspapers submitted 1,874 entries, 20 daily newspapers sent 830 entries, 33 weekly newspapers sent 1,044. Their submissions were then judged by members of the Colorado Press Association.
Locally, the Melbourne Times received Honorable Mention for Picture Page in Medium Weeklies; the Batesville Daily Guard received First Place in General Excellence in Medium Dailies; and the Stone County Leader of Mountain View received Honorable Mention in General Excellence.

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IZARD COUNTY RELAY FOR LIFE 2015: Cancer survivors walk amidst confetti during the opening ceremony at the Izard County Relay for Life held at the fairgrounds in Melbourne on Friday, June 5. This year’s theme “Wish Upon a Cure” was reflected in nine teams that participated, and $6,000 was raised to help find a cure for cancer. The Survivor’s Banquet was held at 5:30 p.m. and the meal was provided by Artisan Restaurant of Highland, with desserts provided by the teams. Russell’s Barn Burgers were also served throughout the night. Fundraising for Relay for Life began last September, and Friday night’s event represented the last coordinated event of the year. Team participants carried spirit sticks while walking around the center track until midnight, representing the fact that people with cancer never quit. Each team had a themed booth and fundraising activities during the night. Izard County Relay for Life thanks everyone who helped sponsor the different events and donated to the cause this year. Additional photos from Relay for Life can be found on page 7 in this week’s edition of the Pacesetting Times. Photo/K.Sherrell

The Emergency Medical Services Board of Izard County will have their quarterly meeting at 6 p.m. on Monday, June 22, in the courtroom at the Izard County Courthouse in Melbourne. The meeting is open to the public and everyone is invited to attend.
For questions, please contact Michelle Gray at 870-291-2515.

Every ten years Cherokee Village celebrates the diverse culture and history of their community.
This year marks the 60th Diamond Jubilee Anniversary and Cherokee Village is planning the biggest celebration ever!
The celebration/reunion will span three days, June 12 through 14, and will include a parade, live music, boat tours, kids activities – bounce houses, carnival games, face painting; arts and crafts, teen mixers, golf tournaments and a street dance just to name a few. Someone will win the Diamond in the Ozarks Treasure Hunt™ grand prize, a diamond valued up to $5,000! A very special moment will happen Saturday morning, June 13 with a parade and procession of flags from every state in the nation and some 20 countries representing the property owners of Cherokee Village.
A Diamond in the Ozarks Treasure Hunt™ is sponsored by St. Bernards Healthcare and Sissy’s Log Cabin will be held from noon to 6 p.m. following the parade.
Sapphire sponsors are FNBC Bank and WRMC Medical Complex.
Treasure Hunt General Rules
There is only one entry per person, per treasure hunt. All completed, signed and dated ‘Treasure Hunt Entry Forms’ must be turned in at Registration Booth by 7 p.m., Saturday, June 13. Minors under 18 must have their entry forms signed by their parent or guardian prior to submission for the drawing.
Contestants have six hours in which to explore and discover Cherokee Village in this unique Treasure Hunt designed to provide you with activity, entertainment, adventure and one chance at winning a diamond valued at $5,000. You must be present to win. The winning entry will be drawn at approximately 8 p.m. during the ‘Rewind the 50s’ Sock Hop Dance.
Get Started
Available now or at the celebration: A Diamond in the Ozarks Treasure Hunt™ Map and Official Treasure Hunt Entry Form at the Registration booth located in Celebration Central, which is located across from City Hall in Cherokee Village. Decide which of the five treasure hunts fits your lifestyle and plan to make it a day enjoying the amenities and hearing about our Village.
At each stop on your hunt, YOU MUST get your Treasure Hunt Entry Form stamped by the staff on hand AFTER you take time to enjoy, see and hear about the site. Official rules and regulations are located on the Treasure Hunt Entry Form. Maps can be picked up at Carol’s Lakeview Restaurant, City Hall, First Community Bank, FNBC Bank, King-Rhodes, the Senior Lodge, S.I.D., Triple D Package Store and the Welcome Center at Cherokee Village. Other locations include Curves at Highland, the Red Mule, Best Western, Horton’s Music, The Ozark Mall and Clary Fitness at Ash Flat.
A free movie on the history of Cherokee Village will be held at the Omaha Center on Thursday, June 11 at 10 a.m. and then again at 2 p.m.
On Friday, June 12 events will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. beginning with a Dedication Ceremony. A Campfire Sing-Along will begin at 7 p.m. featuring Doug Driesel on the grounds at Old Kia Kima, Teen Mingle, Kidsz Zone, Wine and Beer Garden sponsored by Triple D Package Store, and The Mystix in concert at 7 p.m. featuring Dennis Horton & Guys.
Lake Thunderbird Queen Tours will be conducted June 12 and 13 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., a nearly 45 minute ride around the lake. Those interested can enjoy a Drop in Golf Tournament both days as well, and compete for prizes, all sponsored by Cherokee Village S.I.D. Horseshoe Pitching will be held both days: 4 – 7 p.m. on Friday, and noon to 7 p.m. on Saturday.
A Mobile Vet Center for veterans will be open at 9 a.m. at Celebration Central.
A Time to Shine Parade sponsored by First Community Bank, begins at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 13 with the Treasure Hunt to follow. The parade will begin at Carol’s Lakeview Restaurant, travel down Iroquois to Town Center, turn left at the Village Repair Station and continue through the Cherokee Village Town Homes, ending at King Rhodes parking lot. At 1:30 p.m. enjoy music by Judah’s Groove Temple, then at 3 p.m. enjoy music by Bonafide String Band. At 5:30 p.m. Maybe April will perform. Rewind at the 50’s Sock Hop Dance, sponsored by Clary Fitness, will be held from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. with prizes awarded for Best Costumes and dances.
On Sunday, June 14 from noon to 3:30 p.m. a barbeque luncheon and recognition ceremony will be held at Celebration Central. The Tri County Board of REALTORS will hold Open Houses throughout Cherokee Village from 1 to 4 p.m. on Sunday.
Most importantly this Diamond Jubilee Celebration is the opportunity for the national and international community that is Cherokee Village to reunite with friends and old acquaintances. Please make your plans now to be a part of the celebration.
Come early, bring your lawn chair and relax and enjoy!

The Pacesetting Times garnered a Third Place Sweepstakes Award in the 2015 Arkansas Press Association’s Better Newspaper Advertising Contest.
The newspaper won eleven additional awards which were presented at the Awards Luncheon held at the Winthrop Rockefeller Institute at Petit Jean Mountain on Friday, March 13.
Attending the awards luncheon were Pacesetting Times staff members Carrie Johnson and Cassie Stafford.
The newspaper garnered five second place awards, four third place awards, and two honorable mentions, to capture the third place Sweepstakes Award.
In the Smaller Weeklies Division, Second Place went to Karen Sherrell for Best Festival-Special Event Ad for her Horseshoe Bend Chamber of Commerce Dogwood Days ad; Sherrell and Carrie Johnson won in: Promotion of Newspaper, “Find Something New to Howl About”; Best Use of Clip Art for Gray Family Practice, “Back to School Excitement”; Best Ad Campaign for Artisan Restaurant; Single Ad Half Page and Over, for Izard County Democratic Party, “Vote Democratic.”
In the Smaller Weeklies Division, Third Place went to Sherrell and Johnson in Best Use of Process Color for M&M Landscaping, “50% off Shrubs”; and Best Use of Humor for Tri County Medical Supply, “Kabooti Comfort.”
In All Weeklies, Third Place went to Sherrell for Best Single Supplement Ad, Magazine, for Spring River Home Health, “Welcome Home”; for Sherrell and Johnson, Best Automotive Classified Ad for Turkey Mountain Motors, “No Sales Tax.”
Honorable Mention was awarded to Sherrell and Johnson in Multiple Advertiser, for “Horseshoe Bend Trunk or Treat”; and Single Ad, Over 10”, Under Half, Izard County Propane, “New Business Opening.”
This year’s contest was judged by members of the Colorado Press Association with 38 Arkansas daily and weekly newspapers submitting 1,036 entries.
Locally, the Batesville Daily Guard won First Place Sweepstakes in Medium Dailies, and the Stone County Leader of Mountain View won Second Place Sweepstakes in Larger Weeklies.

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Box Hound Marina in Horseshoe Bend is hosting the 2015 Polar Plunge on behalf of Special Olympics Arkansas, SOAR.
The Polar Plunge will be held on January 17, with registration beginning at noon and the plunge at 1 p.m. Sponsorship/contribution forms may be picked up at Box Hound Marina, Horseshoe Bend Area Chamber of Commerce and Pacesetting Times.
Those interested in taking the plunge need to pick up a sponsorship form for pledges. Special awards will be given for Best Costume, individual, pair, and team; and First Place for the most money raised to individual, pair, and team.
Incentive for $50 minimum collected per plunger is an official Plunge T-Shirt; $250 collected, plunger will receive a Plunge T-Shirt and Beach Towel; $500 collected will include Plunge T-Shirt, Beach Towel, and a 60”x50” Fleece Sherpa Blanket; and $1,000+ collected donations entitles the plunger to a Plunge T-Shirt, Beach Towel, 60”x50” Fleece Sherpa Blanket, and a 32-can Rolling Cooler.
SOAR was incorporated as a non-profit, 501(c)(3) organization in 1974. Their mission is to provide year-round sports training and Olympic-type competition for children and adults with intellectual disabilities in Arkansas. Currently more than 14,000 athletes participate in training and compete in a year-round program of 20 different sports.
Through the strong network of volunteer coaches, Special Olympic athletes spend countless hours preparing for the opportunity to compete for gold, silver or bronze medals. In a sense athletes are training for life itself. Training becomes an important stepping stone into communities throughout Arkansas for our athletes and their families.
The vision of SOAR is to transform communities by changing lives through sports.
So plungers, get your sponsorship/contribution form, then get your sponsors, and be ready to take the 2015 Polar Plunge at Box Hound Marina on Crown Lake in Horseshoe Bend on January 17.

Natosha “Tosha” Alysse (Goodman) Brink, 24, of Hardy, Arkansas, died Thursday, October 30, 2014, near Black Rock. She was born December 13, 1989, in Topeka, Kansas, to Edward Luther Goodman Sr. and Carmen Denise Musick Goodman. She was a graduate of Arthur’s Beauty College in Jonesboro, Ark. and was of the Baptist faith.
Tosha was preceded in death by her grandfathers, Edward Goodman and Tom Pedano.
Survivors include her husband, Alex Brink of the home; two sons, Braxton Wayne Goodman and Walker William Brink both of Hardy; one daughter, Abigail Chyanne Stanford of Hardy; two stepsons, Kaden Brink and Gage Brink both of Glencoe; her parents, Edward and Carmen Goodman of Ash Flat; two brothers, Edward Luther Goodman Jr. of Fort Carson, Colorado, and Nickolos McCray Goodman of Ash Flat; one sister, Stephanie Gail Goodman of Ash Flat; her grandparents, Cherylene Pedano of Evening Shade, Catherine Delong of Agnos, and William Musick of Nelsonville; several nieces and nephews; and a host of other relatives and friends.
Visitation was held Monday, November 3 from 5 until 8 p.m. at the Tri-County Funeral Home Chapel in Highland.

The Spring River Chamber of Commerce Business Expo will held November 15 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the A. L. Hutson Center in Highland.
At this time 40 businesses are participating. The SRACC invites everyone to come out and check out the Expo and support the Local Business Community, and participate in the food drive.
For additional information, contact SRACC at 870-856-3210, or email sracc@centurytel.net or fax 870-856-3320.

The Knights of Columbus will host a Indoor Rummage Sale at Saint Mary of the Mount Catholic Church in Horseshoe Bend on Friday, November 14, and Saturday, November 15 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Hillbilly U-Pump at Glencoe now has an attendant on duty every day from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m., ready to help customers. The self-serve gas station also offers cigarettes, tobacco, soft drinks and snacks with a drive through window. The station offers discounts on gas and takes cash, debit or credit. Hillbilly U-Pump is located on Hwy. 289 at Glencoe.
Photo/C.Staffordhillbilly

by Bobby Stapleton, sports
The regular season of football has wrapped up and the road to the Championship starts this Friday, November 14, with a couple of the area teams involved.
In the 3A, Melbourne takes on Elkins this Friday night with the winner moving on to take on the winner of the Osceola/Camden Harmony Grove winner on November 21.
In the 4A, Highland takes on Clinton in the first round with the winner moving on to take on the winner of the Dollarway/Gentry game on November 21.

Taking it right at them: Pirate Darby Ketron slices through the defense on his way to the rim against Greers Ferry last week. Full story in the November 12 edition of Pacesetting Times. ketronPhoto/B.Stapleton

Putting on a show: ICC’s Clay Mosley slams home a dunk against Norfork last Friday night. Mosley finished with 13 points on the night. Cougars held on in overtime 64-61.See full game highlights in the November 12 edition of Pacesetting Times. mosely Photo/B.Stapleton

There will be a recount on the Horseshoe Bend Ward 4, Position 1 Alderman race, Friday, November 7 at 10 a.m. at the Izard County Courthouse courtroom, in Melbourne.

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The 19th Annual Food Drive sponsored by the Pacesetting Times is now underway.
“Join us again this Holiday season in helping your neighbors and friends,” said Karen Sherrell, publisher of Pacesetting Times. Donate two or more non-perishable food items and receive a free classified ad that can be used anytime, from now until March 31, 2015.
“We will deliver donated food items through December 12 to the Food Pantry in Horseshoe Bend,” said Sherrell. The Food Pantry is located behind the Assembly of God Church.
Stop by Pacesetting Times at 703 South Bend Drive in Horseshoe Bend with your food donations, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from now until December 12. Limit one classified ad per family.

That’s far enough: Salem’s Alex Martin takes down a Yellowjacket in a great open field tackle against Mountain View last Friday night. See this and the full game highlights in the September 10 edition of Pacesetting Times!martin Photo/B.Stapleton

The general meeting of the Horseshoe Bend Chamber of Commerce will be held on Thursday, July 17, at 6 p.m.at the Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church in Horseshoe Bend. They will be serving creamy baked chicken, baked potato, glazed carrots, sweet/sour cabbage slaw, rolls, apple caramel cake and a drink, all for $10.
Speaker for the evening is Jeremy Risley, a biologist from Arkansas Game and Fish Commission. Paul Port, Fisheries Management Biologist, will also be attending the meeting.
Everyone is invited, chamber members or non-members. If you plan on attending, please RSVP by calling the chamber office at 870-670-5433 by 3 p.m. on Wednesday, July 16.

This month, the Music in the Mountains Show will be on Saturday, July 19 at 6 p.m. in the Music in the Mountains Theatre located in the lower level of the Diamond B Mall in Horseshoe Bend.
The theme will be “Singer’s Choice” where each band member will pick the songs that they want to perform. This should make for a wide variety of songs and should include something for everyone.
Guests this month will include locals Tom Machado, Jonathan Phillips on brass and from Evening Shade, Penny Wolfe. The doors open at 5 p.m. with Marty grilling hamburgers and hotdogs, the mayor popping popcorn, and the girls making sure that all your thirsty needs are met. Join them for some fantastic toe tapping music and delicious food. See you there!!

A Horseshoe Bend couple was arrested on July 8 on multiple theft of property charges. According to Sheriff Tate Lawrence, allegations are that while employed at the Eagles Club, the couple wrote checks to the club and then stopped payment on the checks.
Blake L. Lawrence, age 30 is accused of writing three such checks while his 24 year old wife, Heather Lawrence, is accused of writing six checks. They each posted a cash bond the day of their arrest in the amounts of $1,000 and $2,000.
In an alcohol related arrest, Joshua D. Jones, age 32 of Melbourne was arrested July 12 on the charge of driving while intoxicated. Jones posted bond the following day in the amount of $1,000, was released and was given a court date of July 17.
Clayton Doyle Henderson, age 32 of Oxford was arrested July 7 on two felony aggravated assault charges. Henderson posted bond that same day in the amount of $10,000 and was given a court date.
Alcohol resulted in the arrest of Tracey Lynn Alex on July 12. Alex, age 44 of Oxford was charged with public intoxication. The arrest followed a call to the Horton residence at 156 Parker Lane. Apparently an altercation occurred earlier at that residence involving Alex and a juvenile female. The juvenile was issued a citation for battery third degree and given a court date in Izard County Juvenile Court.
The incident at the Horton residence continues to be investigated. Meanwhile, Alex remains in the Izard County Detention Facility on an investigative hold.

The Calico Rock Pirates travel to North Arkansas College in Harrison on Friday, March 7 and take on Stephens in 1A state basketball. Game time is 5:30 p.m. The Norfork Panthers take on Caddo Hills at 8:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 6. Viola Lady Longhorns take on Caddo Hillsj on Thursday as well, at 7 p.m.

The Salem Greyhounds and Lady Greyhounds travelled to Pangburn last week for regional action.
The Greyhounds lost in first round action against EPC 46-60 ending their season. The Lady Greyhounds beat Rector 63-62 and fell to Marmaduke 64-35 putting them in the consolation bracket and earning them a trip to state.
The Lady Greyhounds will take on Spring Hill at 1 p.m. at Hampton High School on Friday, March 7.

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Melbourne Lady Bearkatz were tough throughout regional action and won runner up in the championship game against Rivercrest, 53-61 in Mountain View on Saturday, March 1. The Lady Katz punched their ticket to state with their win over Corning 68-37 and Manila in overtime 60-58. They will travel to Charleston High School and play Danville at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 7 in first round state hoops. Photo/V.Haas

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The Melbourne Bearkatz took the runner up slot in Regional action and garnered a spot in state with their win over Osceola 76-68 and Valley Springs 37-34. The Katz travel to Charleston High School on Friday, March 7 and take on Cedarville at 8:30 p.m. Photo/V.Haas

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The Izard County Lady Cougars won Regional runner-up and advance to the Class 1A State Tournament at Harrison on Friday at 7 p.m. and will play the Bradley Lady Bears in the first round. The Izard County Cougars take on Emerson at 8:30 p.m. Photo/T.Stephens

Celtic Breeze Band and the U.S. Forest Service invite you to attend Celtic in the Caverns, a concert featuring Scottish and Irish music played from one of the worlds most impressive natural stages, the Great Cathedral Room at Blanchard Springs Caverns, just north of Mountain View.
Show times are Saturday, March 15 at 2 and 5 p.m., and Sunday, March 16 at 2 p.m.
Tickets are $20 cash or $21 credit. Price includes admission to the cavern stage, but does not include the full cave tour.
Tickets and information are available at For Mother Earth, located on Main Street in Mountain View or by calling 870-585-2406.
Seating is limited to 100 per show.

Youth exhibitors in the seven-county North Central Arkansas District Fair area are reminded that online entries for the Spring Junior Livestock Show opened on March 1 and will close on March 31. The show will be held April 17 and 18 at the fairgrounds at Melbourne. Junior exhibitors from Cleburne, Fulton, Independence, Izard, Sharp, Stone, and Van Buren counties are eligible to enter beef cattle, goats, and horses in the spring show.
The tabloid, with a schedule and a complete listing of classes, is available on the district fair website at http://www.ncadistrictfair.org/.
Exhibitors must enter online before March 31 and all entry fees must be received by that date. There is a link to online entries on the fair website. Entry fees should be mailed to NCA District Fair, Post Office Box 92, Sturkie, 72578.

Sharp County voters are headed to the polls.
A special election will be held on Tuesday, March 11 to determine a 1.5 percent sales tax increase county-wide providing for the operation and maintenance of a new county hospital.
Sharp County Quorum Court justices voted on ordinances pertaining to the building of the hospital, and issuance of bonds to finance the hospital in November of 2013. The ordinances will take effect if the sales tax is approved by voters.
If voter approved, the 40,000 square foot, 19-bed facility would be county-owned but not county-managed. St. Bernard’s Healthcare has expressed their interest in equipping, staffing and managing the proposed hospital. The hospital would be a two-story facility, with a fully equipped emergency room, open 24/7, have a state of the art imaging center, laboratory, pharmacy, administration and food service.
Sharp County will be reimbursed for the cost of the special election, between $20,000 to $25,000, by the Sharp County Hospital Foundation.
Voters will decide on a one percent sales tax to provide for the operation and maintenance of a new county hospital with various departments and facilities, including emergency medicine, radiology, physical therapy, acute care and rehab. Voters will also decide on a half percent sales tax to pay on the bond issuance for the construction of the hospital.
Opponents of the proposed new hospital say the new tax rate will be among the highest in the state. Local cities within the county currently have sales taxes ranging from 7.50% to 9%.
Proponents state the county has been without a hospital for ten years, and one is needed in the county, for the citizens and for future generations to come. They feel a good health care system is an integral part of community growth and stability.
Voters will decide on Tuesday, March 11. Early voting began March 4 at the Sharp County Courthouse, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

CrownPoint Health and Rehab, 1203 South Bend Drive, will be hosting a free Community Health Fair on Friday, March 7 in Horseshoe Bend.
They will open their lobby from 8 to 11:30 a.m. for the community to participate in free health services.
The Ozarka College LPN Class will be offering free cholesterol and blood pressure checks, and CrownPoint Health will have free glucometer and oxygen checks, and balance screenings by a physical therapist. Local and surrounding area health industry businesses will have booths, and there will be snacks and a door prize.

The Hardy Garden Club is hosting an Indoor Flea Market/Craft Bazaar this Saturday, February 22 from – 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. in the Old Hardy Gym.
Over 20 vendors will be there.

A traffic stop was initiated Monday morning, February 17 on a motorcycle that was traveling at a high rate of speed near the Diamond B shopping mall in Horseshoe Bend.
Izard County Sheriff Tate Lawrence said the driver of the motorcycle failed to stop for Deputy Mike Smith, and a pursuit continued through various areas of the city eventuallyy onto State Highway 289. The cycle with a passenger on board traveled in excess of 80 miles per hour, failed to stop at several stop signs and often crossed the center line. Deputy Smith radioed for assistance and Corporal Mark Simino established a road block west of Wiseman; however, the driver lost control of the motorcycle and wrecked before reaching the road block.
Kenneth R. Stephens II, age 29 with addresses in Batesville and Star Cit,y and his 22 year old female passenger were thrown to the ground when the motorcycle crashed. Stephens then threw his coat and helmet to the ground and continued to flee on foot but was quickly apprehended by Smith.
Vital Link transported the female passenger to a hospital and Corp. Simino transported Stephens to a hospital before taking him to the Izard County Detention Facility. Stephens was charged with 15 traffic offenses and five criminal offenses to include possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia- two counts, and fleeing. The female passenger was not charged.
Stephens remains in the Izard County Detention Facility on these charge as well as seven Sharp County warrants including a parole violation.

Early Tuesday morning, February 11, Izard County deputies and the Arkansas State Police were dispatched to a field off of Lafferty Road, Mt. Pleasant in response to a body in that location. Dale E. Strader, age 58 of Mt. Pleasant was found. Sheriff Tate Lawrence said it appeared that Strader was leaving a residence the night before and possibly fell on the ice and snow. Lawrence said there were no signs of foul play. The body was sent to the state crime laboratory and a report from the medical examiner’s office said that there was no trauma to the body and that Stader likely died from natural causes or from the extreme cold. A toxicology report is pending from that office.

Izard County District Court in Melbourne scheduled for Thursday, February 6th was cancelled due to inclement weather and dangerous road conditions. District Judge David E. Miller said persons scheduled to appear in court that day are rescheduled for Thursday, February 20 at 8:30 a.m.

The Fulton County Fair Association is now accepting vendors for the 11th Annual Spring Fairgrounds Flea Market on April 11 and 12 in Salem. Inside spaces are 8×8 ft. and rent for $30, a double space, 8×16 ft., is $50, or a triple space, 8×24 ft., is $80. Outside space is 12×20 ft. and the rental fee is $40. There is a $5 charge for electricity.
A limited number of spaces are available. Vendor applications are available at www.fultoncountyfair.org or an application can be mailed by calling 870-895-5565 or 870-458-3080 or email fultoncountyfair@centurytel.net.
The Salem Chamber of Commerce Community-Wide Yard Sale will also be on these dates.
The two events are advertised statewide and draw a large number of people to Salem for this weekend.

Paul William Buck was born the son of Gene Merlin Buck and Norma Jean (Collins) Buck on February 14, 1954, in Janesville, Wisconsin. He departed this life February 2, 2014, at his residence in Franklin, at the age of 59 years. He was united in marriage on March 28, 2013 in Highland, to Lora R. Umphries.
He is survived by his wife, his mother, his four daughters, Dawn Borchardt and husband, Shawn, of Custer, South Dakota, Tara Ritter and husband Steve of Rockaway Beach, Missouri, Cherish Buck of Tacoma, Washington and Nicole Peters and husband William of Wahiawa, Hawaii, his son, Cory Wright and wife Jeri of St. Louis, Missouri, stepchildren, Clarence Bricker III and wife Lesley and Crystal Ping and husband Josh, both of Terre Haute, Indiana. Twenty grandchildren were shared by Paul and Lora. Paul is also survived by two brothers, John Buck and wife Karen of Broadhead, Wisconsin, and James Buck and wife Cynthia of Violet Hill, two sisters, Sue Miller and husband Lance of Glencoe, and Mary Smith and husband Rocky of Violet Hill, several nieces and nephews, other relatives, and many friends. He was preceded in death by his father, and nephew Simon R. Buck (son of James and Cynthia Buck.) Paul worked in the construction and carpentry business most of his life. He enjoyed doing woodworking activities for family and friends. Earlier in his life he worked at a charcoal plant in Missouri for many years. He enjoyed the outdoors and and loved walks in the woods, gardening with Lora and fishing. His main purpose in these later years was to know the Lord and to do as God had directed him to do.
He was a member of the Word Works Ministries Church of Highland, and will be remembered as a devoted husband, father, and grandfather, as well as a loyal friend. He will truly be missed by all.
There will be two memorials for Paul, one at the Word Works Ministries in Highland, on Sunday, February 23, with Rev. Joan Counts officiating and the other at the Assembly of God in Horseshoe Bend, on Sunday, February 16 at 2 p.m., with Rev. Berlin Walker officiating.

Chairman Marty McKnight called the regular meeting of the Finance Committee to order at 6 p.m. on February 12.
Present: Aldermen James Davis, Nate Wolff, Nicki West, McKnight, Sonny Minze, John Grochowski, Ron Yow, Mayor Bob Barnes and Recorder/Treasurer Michelle Grabowski.
Absent: Alderman Harold Faigle.
Approval of Minutes: Yow moved to accept January 2014 Finance Committee minutes, as presented, seconded by West. Motion passed unanimously.
Barnes reported the city received $18,624.82 in sales tax for the month of January 2014. Mayor Barnes thanked the public works department for their efforts and putting in extra time clearing the streets.
Barnes moved to defer the treasurer’s report to the city council, seconded by Minze. Motion passed unanimously by roll call vote.
Under unfinished business: None
Under new business:
The committee discussed snow removal.
Barnes handed out a Snow Removal Fact Sheet. A copy may be viewed on the cities website.
West read a prepared statement regarding the recent snow/ice storm. She recommends the city consider outfitting a city pickup truck with a plow blade to assist with snow removal. The committee also discussed the possibility of obtaining a grant to purchase a truck outfitted with a snowplow.
Barnes prepared a spreadsheet to identify all elected officials property taxes paid in 2013 as an example of what the city actually receives. The total taxes paid in this group were $9,292.08 and out of taxes paid the city received $929.20 and the street department received $278.76. His point was to clear up the misunderstanding that all property taxes paid are distributed to the city. He reiterated that the budget for the street department is limited. The cost to salt all the roads in Horseshoe Bend one time would have been approximately $11,000. The Mayor stated the street department did a great job considering their limited resources and the unprecedented conditions. The surrounding cities have been contacted requesting a status update of their clean-up efforts and they stated that it is a work in progress.
Yow suggested the city recognize Bob Johnson, Commander of the American Legion, for all his efforts-specifically obtaining the cannon for Veterans Park.
The committee addressed questions from the audience.
With no further business to come before the committee Yow moved to adjourn, seconded by Davis, motion carried unanimously.
The next Finance Committee meeting is scheduled for March 12 at 6 p.m.
Respectfully submitted
Michelle Grabowski
Recorder/Treasurer

The Izard County Animal Resue Effort is holding its 11th Annual Paws and Claws Rummage Sale on Friday and Saturday, February 21 and 22, at the Izard County Fairground Exhibit Building in Melbourne. This is the largest rummage sale around, and it is all inside!
Concessions will be available with hot dog and hamburger lunches, chili, drinks and baked goods.
On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., there will also be a pet vaccinations clinic, with Nanci Solis of Thousand Hills Vet Service, where you can bring your dogs on a leash and/or cats in a carrier, and get your pets vaccinated at a reduced cost. Rabies vaccination will be $10. Nail trimming and other vet related services will also be available.
Come on out, have lunch, buy some treasure, and support a great cause!

Rhonda Halbrook, County and Circuit Clerk for Izard County has announced that she will not run for re-election this year.
Rhonda was elected Clerk in 1994 and took office January 1st, 1995 and at the end of her current term will have served as County and Circuit Clerk for 20 years.
Rhonda also served at Deputy Clerk for 15 years prior to being elected.
She made the following statement:
“It has been an honor and privilege to serve you, the Citizens of Izard County and to work with so many other dedicated public servants over the past 35 years.
“ I will forever be grateful that I was given the opportunity to serve as your County and Circuit Clerk.”

This year represents a mid-term election nationally, and local county and municipal office seats are up for grabs.
County positions of Sheriff, Judge, Justices of the Peace, Assessor, Collector, Treasurer, Coroner, and Constable will be voted on this year.
Candidates with a party affiliation begin filing on Monday, February 24 at noon for a one-week period ending at noon on March 3. Party pledges, if any, and affidavits of eligibility shall be filed, and any filing fees of a political party shall be paid at the county courthouse in Melbourne.
Party filing fee amounts are: Judge, $950; Sheriff, $930; Clerk, $870; Treasurer, $840; Assessor, $840; Collector, $840; Justice of the Peace, $78; Coroner, $92; Democratic Committee, $5; Constable, $10; Calico Rock Mayor, $340.
The Preferential Primary Election will be held Tuesday, May 20. Following the primary election, winning candidates will run against independent candidates in the General Election on November 4. Deadline to register to vote in the Preferential Primary Election is Monday, April 21.