William Q. and Ann B. Hamby transferred part of the NE 1/4 NE 1/4 of Section 11, Township 17N, Range 11W, to Michael G. Richardson, for the amount of $1.
Edward D. Lester transferred part of the SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 14, Township 17N, Range 11W, to Milford and Freda May, for the amount of $10,000.
Bristol Industries, LLC, transferred Lot 46, Pioneer Park Addition, Horseshoe Bend, to Connie and Steve Tapie, for the amount of $1,513.
Bobby Brown transferred the NE frl. 1/4 of the SE frl. 1/4 in Section 21, Township 16N, Range 8W, to Tommy and Robin Wommack, and Nicholas S. Wommack, for the amount of $43,000.
Laurence L. and May L. Ellzey transferred Lot 14, Oak Ridge Estates, to Van and Deborah Gordon, for the amount of $26,500.
Charles G. and Sharon R. Williams transferred Lots 906 and 907, Pioneer Park Addition, Horseshoe Bend, to Doris A. Price, for the amount of $40,500.
Aaron B. and Sarah Teague transferred part of the SE 1/4 NE 1/4, Section 14, Township 17N, Range 11W, to Stephen and Linda Williams, for the amount of $128,000.
J. C. Clements transferred Lot 200, Cedar Glade Addition, Horseshoe Bend, to Charles and Jackie Smythe, for the amount of $2,900.
Dorothy Pinkston transferred part of the SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 12, Township 17N, Range 11W, to David D and Janie L. Fender, for the amount of $10,000.
James and Gloria Lindsey transferred all that lying north of Tract 2 and all that lying south and east of the railroad track in White River Meadows Addt., to Malcolm Hutchins, for the amount of $1,000.
Mark L. Grasse, managing member of Grasse Enterprises, LLC, transferred part of the S 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 01, Township 17N, Range 11W with exceptions, to the Jennings Family Trust, for the amount of $21,000.
Joseph R. DeCicco transferred Lots 341, 342, and 343 in Executive Addition Horseshoe Bend, to Cecil D. and Ruth M. Gamble, for the amount of $360,000.
Dwight and Carol Ragsdale transferred part of the S 1/2 NE 1/4 of Section 12, Township 17N, Range 11W, containing 10 acres, m/l, and part of the SE 1/4 NE 1/4 of Section 12, Township 17N, Range 11W, containing .11 acres, m/l, with exceptions, to Darron and Tiffany Preston, for the amount of $93,800.
Zachary Shane Wortham transferred Lot 10, Rose Valley Subdivision, part of Section 16 and 17, Township 16N, Range 8W, to Robert M. and Joy L. Stephens, for the amount of $169,500.
Tabra McGill transferred the S 1/2 of the SE 1/4 of Section 2 and the E 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of Section 11, Township 15N, and Range 8W, to Circle T Properties, LLC, for the amount of $177,800.
Coy Womack, authorized administrator of the Estate of Theda M. Lawhon, transferred part of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 7, Township 16N, Range 8W, to Ben Cooper, for the amount of $95,000.
Lawson Linn transferred 1.29 acres, m/l, part of the NW 1/4 of Section 8, Township 16N, Range 8W to Justin and Lacey Thornton, for the amount of $43,000.

Law scales on wooden desk concept for justice and equality


William Q. and Ann B. Hamby transferred part of the NE 1/4 NE 1/4 of Section 11, Township 17N, Range 11W, to Michael G. Richardson, for the amount of $1.
Edward D. Lester transferred part of the SE 1/4 of the NE 1/4 of Section 14, Township 17N, Range 11W, to Milford and Freda May, for the amount of $10,000.
Bristol Industries, LLC, transferred Lot 46, Pioneer Park Addition, Horseshoe Bend, to Connie and Steve Tapie, for the amount of $1,513.
Bobby Brown transferred the NE frl. 1/4 of the SE frl. 1/4 in Section 21, Township 16N, Range 8W, to Tommy and Robin Wommack, and Nicholas S. Wommack, for the amount of $43,000.
Laurence L. and May L. Ellzey transferred Lot 14, Oak Ridge Estates, to Van and Deborah Gordon, for the amount of $26,500.
Charles G. and Sharon R. Williams transferred Lots 906 and 907, Pioneer Park Addiiton, Horseshoe Bend, to Doris A. Price, for the amount of $40,500.
Aaron B. and Sarah Teague transferred part of the SE 1/4 NE 1/4, Section 14, Township 17N, Range 11W, to Stephen and Linda Williams, for the amount of $128,000.
J. C. Clements transferred Lot 200, Cedar Glade Addition, Horseshoe Bend, to Charles and Jackie Smythe, for the amount of $2,900.
Dorothy Pinkston transferred part of the SW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 12, Township 17N, Range 11W, to David D and Janie L. Fender, for the amount of $10,000.
James and Gloria Lindsey transferred all that lying north of Tract 2 and all that lying south and east of the railroad track in White River Meadows Addt., to Malcolm Hutchins, for the amount of $1,000.
Mark L. Grasse, managing member of Grasse Enterprises, LLC, transferred part of the S 1/2 of the SW 1/4 of Section 01, Township 17N, Range 11W with exceptions, to the Jennings Family Trust, for the amount of $21,000.
Joseph R. DeCicco transferred Lots 341, 342, and 343 in Executive Addition Horseshoe Bend, to Cecil D. and Ruth M. Gamble, for the amount of $360,000.
Dwight and Carol Ragsdale transferred part of the S 1/2 NE 1/4 of Section 12, Township 17N, Range 11W, containing 10 acres, m/l, and part of the SE 1/4 NE 1/4 of Section 12, Township 17N, Range 11W, containing .11 acres, m/l, with exceptions, to Darron and Tiffany Preston, for the amount of $93,800.
Zachary Shane Wortham transferred Lot 10, Rose Valley Subdivision, part of Section 16 and 17, Township 16N, Range 8W, to Robert M. and Joy L. Stephens, for the amount of $169,500.
Tabra McGill transferred the S 1/2 of the SE 1/4 of Section 2 and the E 1/2 of the NE 1/4 of Section 11, Township 15N, and Range 8W, to Circle T Properties, LLC, for the amount of $177,800.
Coy Womack, authorized administrator of the Estate of Theda M. Lawhon, transferred part of the NW 1/4 of the NW 1/4 of Section 7, Township 16N, Range 8W, to Ben Cooper, for the amount of $95,000.
Lawson Linn transferred 1.29 acres, m/l, part of the NW 1/4 of Section 8, Township 16N, Range 8W to Justin and Lacey Thornton, for the amount of $43,000.


A Proclamation, issued by Horseshoe Bend Mayor Bob Barnes on May 1 resolves that the week of May 7 through May 13, 2017 was designated as Municipal Clerks Week. There are many responsibilities of the Municipal and Deputy Clerk that the public takes for granted. The functions of the Clerk necessitate a thorough knowledge of law procedure, administration and interpersonal relations. The Municipal Clerks of Horseshoe Bend are greatly appreciated. Pictured (l to r) Shelia Butler, Deputy Court Clerk, Victoria Bigness, Administrative Clerk, Barb Kurtzweil, Water Department Clerk, and Michelle Grabowski, City Clerk. Read the entire Proclamation on page 2 of this week’s Pacesetting Times.


The Municipal Recreation Improvement District, MRID, meeting was called to order at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 9 with the Pledge of Allegiance and prayer.
Commissioners Present: Mac James, Jonathon Phillips, Jack Tharp and Michael Stracener.
Managers Present: Josh Jackson.
Jackson reported all spring pre-emergent and post-emergent has been applied to all areas of the golf course. The greens will undergo deep tine aerification during the middle of April. The drainage ditch on Hole 13 has been completed.
James reported for Chuck McNeight and recommended all memberships stay the same for the 2017 season. He recommended that the driving range memberships increase to $125 per person. Motion passed unanimously.
After asking the Commissioners if they had any changes to the November 11 MRID meeting minutes, there were none, James stated that those minutes are approved as written.
Tharp suggested changing vacation time in the employee handbook to read: one year one week vacation, three years two weeks vacation and seven years three weeks vacation. After much discussion the issue has been tabled until the next meeting.
James made a motion to approve a Boat Launch at Fishermen’s Park, if funds were available. After much discussion the motion has been tabled until the next meeting.
Phillips brought to the attention of the board that moving the forward tees up on some of the holes would be beneficial to many players. After some discussion no decision was made, but will be discussed further.
The Boating and Fishing Club gave their report and would like to be placed on the agenda at every MRID regular scheduled meeting.
Tharp moved to adjourn the meeting and Phillips seconded. All were in favor and the meeting adjourned at 7:18 p.m.
Respectfully submitted,
Josh Jackson
MRID Superintendent

by Sharon VanZandt
Members and guests, join us for another busy month at the Loft! Every Tuesday Pool Tournaments begin at 6:30 p.m. Want to learn to line dance with a fun group? Join us every Thursday at 6 p.m.
Saturday, February 11 will be a real treat for our club! Entertainers Penny Wolfe, Erin Walters, Shannon Rounds and Eric Mallot will be singing and playing some great music for your listening or dancing pleasure. There is a $5 cover charge, you don’t want to miss this great night. Social hour begins at 6 p.m. with entertainment at 7 p.m.
Friday, February 17 will be our Fifth Annual Chili Cook-off! DJ Doctor Steve Clark will also be playing his great dancing music after the cook-off. See our ad in the Pacesetting Times classifieds for details. There will be no Potluck this month. Friday, February 24 will be our Birthday and Anniversary night. This month we will be celebrating both January and February. Sing along to Karaoke with the Slavins at 7 p.m. For more information contact the Loft at 870-670-4411. The Loft is located atop the Pro Shop on Turkey Mountain.

Gary Owens

When you’ve been in the shoe business for 61 years, you know what you’re doing. And let’s just say, Gary Owens of Union, knows his shoes.
Raised in Union, Gary began working for Noah Caruthers at the Salem Shoe Shop, when he was 11. He remembers running the shop alone for a week, at age 14, when Noah went on vacation. This job led Gary to Little Rock in 1966, where he worked for Snell Prosthetic Orthotics Lab until 2015. He remained there for 46 years. “There were five people employed there in the beginning, then 60 when I left, with ten labs. I was supervisor for all the labs,” he said. Gary built shoes, braces and orthopedic appliances until his retirement in February of 2015.
Gary and his wife Brenda opened Owens Corner Store in Union, a little over a year later, in June of 2016, and he has a workshop at the store, repairing shoes, saddles, purses and billfolds. He sells Cowtown boots at his shop as well. His slogan that can be seen on the storefront window is “Saving your sole so your boot can heel.”
Owens Corner Store is located on Hwy. 9, and they offer groceries, deli items, sandwiches, Hunt’s Brothers Pizza, wings and wingbites, ice, propane, and more. Gary and Brenda invite everyone to come by and have a free cup of coffee. The store is open Monday through Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., and is closed on Sunday.


PROUD FAMILY: (l to r) Howard and Janice Blankenship, Eli Blankenship – American FFA Degree recipient, and Sheila and Danny Blankenship.

by Karen Sherrell
The American FFA Degree is awarded to less than one percent of FFA members, and is one of the organization’s highest honors.
In 2016, the degree was awarded to Izard County Consolidated graduate, Eli Blankenship of Bandmill.
The 2016 American FFA Degree Ceremony was held in Indianapolis, IN on October 22, during the Eighth General Session of the 89th National FFA Convention Expo. Blankenship joined 34 other degree recipients from Arkansas, and 3,790 from throughout the United States, chosen from a national roll of 629,367 FFA members.
The degree is earned by members who have demonstrated the highest level of commitment to FFA and have made significant accomplishments in their agricultural experiences. All of which describe Eli, through years of hard work and commitment.
This degree has also earned him the title of being the first FFA member at Izard County Consolidated Schools to receive the American FFA Degree since Wayne Neal has been the Agri Teacher and FFA Advisor for the past 14 years. “I have had three other FFA members receive national recognition by earning a National FFA Scholarship,” said Neal, adding, “Eli has not only earned this National Degree, but also the pride, respect and honor of his peers, friends and family, as well as the leaders and mentors before him that inspired him to earn this degree.”
And proud his family is. Accompanying Eli to the ceremony in October were his parents, Danny and Sheila Blankenship, and grandparents, Howard and Janice Blankenship.
Highschool graduates may apply for the American FFA Degree one year after their graduation. Eli graduated in 2014, and is currently in his second year at Arkansas Tech in Russellville.
During his first year in highschool, Eli earned his FFA Greenhand Degree, followed by the Chapter degree the next year, and then his State degree. “Eli raised cattle, chickens, and goats and rabbits,” said his mother Sheila. “He also had a community project he had to do.” Eli’s primary agricultural project was cattle, he was on the ICC Show Team, and he served as an FFA Chapter officer.
FFA members utilize the Agricultural Experience Tracker, AET, which is an online record keeping system for agriculture students to record their time worked or money earned with their projects or Supervised Agricultural Experiences, SAE’s. “They also keep records of their FFA activities, officer work, and time in community service, along with other accomplishments and awards,” said Neal. “Utilizing this system is vital for FFA members to earn the degrees, scholarships and awards that they deserve.”
FFA members must apply for the American FFA Degree one year after they graduate, and Eli’s older brother Isaac, a recent graduate of Arkansas Tech in Russellville, encouraged him to apply. “He had all the steps to do it,” said Sheila, “And he worked hard to earn state recognition.”
To earn the American FFA Degree, members must have received the State FFA Degree, and have been an active member for the past three years, with a record of satisfactory participation in activities on the Chapter and State levels. They must have completed the equivalent of at least three years of systematic secondary school instruction in an agricultural education program, and have one full year of enrollment in a postsecondary agricultural program. They must have maintained an operation and records to substantiate an outstanding supervised agricultural experience program, through which they have exhibited comprehensive planning, managerial and financial expertise. They must have earned at least $10,000 and productively invested $7,500, or earned and invested $2,000 and worked 2,250 hours in excess of scheduled class time. In addition to having a record of outstanding leadership abilities and community involvement, they must have achieved a scholastic record of a C or better, and participated in at least 50 hours of community service within at least three different activities.
No easy feat, and that’s why only one percent of the National FFA membership receive the American FFA Degree. Recipients are also awarded the gold American FFA Degree Key, a symbol of the highest achievement of the National FFA organization, and earned by one hard-working young man, Eli Blankenship.

OPEN: Hwy 289, located between Horseshoe Bend and Glencoe, is now open, following repairs to a bridge which began October 10. Photo/C. Johnson road

backtoschool2
Look for our “Back To School” edition this week in Pacesetting Times! Area schools featured include Izard County Consolidated, Melbourne, Calico Rock and Salem Public Schools. See pages 4 through 9.

A meeting will be held on Thursday, August 11 in the community room at the Horseshoe Bend Area Chamber of Commerce, to discuss long-term care insurance, facilities, and other related topics.
Alex Hicks will give details on long-term care insurance, and Cindy Wildhagen will highlight long-term care facilities. A question and answer session will be held.
Refreshments will be available and the meeting will be 10 a.m. to noon. The chamber office is located at 707 Third Street, Horseshoe Bend. Everyone is invited to come, listen, and ask questions at this informative meeting.

by Karen Sherrell
IZARD COUNTY — A few candidates have filed for municipal office since the opening day of July 29.
In Horseshoe Bend, Tom Richardson, appointed incumbent, has filed for Alderman, Ward 2, Position 2; and Michelle Grabowski, incumbent, has filed for Recorder/Treasurer.
In Calico Rock, Fredrick Blickle has filed for Alderman, Ward 4, Position 1.
In Melbourne, Alecia Bray, incumbent, has filed for Recorder/Treasurer; and Sonia Blankenship has filed for Alderman, Ward 4, Position 2.
Filings for municipal office include candidates for Recorder/Treasurer and City Council, to be voted on during the General Election, November 8.
Candidates need to file petitions of nomination, an affidavit of eligibility, and a political practices pledge with the county clerk of their residency. Friday, August 19 at noon is the deadline to file for office.
Annual school board elections will be held September 20. Deadline to register to vote in the school board election is Monday, August 22.

Over 200 new students participated in orientation at Ozarka College in Mammoth Spring and Ash Flat on August 2, and in Mountain View and Melbourne on August 3. A make-up session for the required new student orientation will be held at 6 p.m. on August 11 at the Melbourne campus.

Ozarka College’s fall semester will begin on August 15, but it is not too late to get registered for fall classes. The College is open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and staff members are available to assist you with completing an application for admissions, applying for financial aid, getting advised and registered for classes, enrolling in student service programs, and anything else to help you succeed.

Ozarka College, committed to YOUR success. For more information, please call 870.368.2024 or email: admisssions@ozarka.edu. Additional information is also available at www.ozarka.edu.

snappy
PAY AT THE PUMP: Snappy Mart Valero of Horseshoe Bend has upgraded their fuel pumps, and now offer pay-at-the-pump, in addition to their convenience store. The Young Kwoon family has operated the station for seven years, and also reside in Horseshoe Bend. Snappy Mart is open seven days a week, from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., and the new pumps may be utilized during those hours. Photo/K.Sherrell

Kaylee Jo Guthrie of Melbourne, has been crowned as the 2016 Miss Arkansas National Teenager.
She was chosen based on academic scores, community service and leadership abilities. Now she will be competing for America’s National Teenager title.
The American National Teenage Scholarship Organization draws on a positive side of pageantry that focuses on a real girl not just her appearance. “It is an honor to be able to represent the beautiful State of Arkansas and the many wonderful people that live here. I would like to thank the many friends and family who have helped me grow up and shaped me into the person I have become today. Please join me on my journey,” said Kaylee Jo.
Kaylee Jo has been a member of 4-H, and for the past seven years she has been keeping a journal of the time, sweat, blood, and energy that has been spent doing 4-H related activities.
“I have kept track of hours used for various projects, money lost and gained with raising/showing animals, and time spent helping shape others around me. This was the first year I was able to compete in the 4-H State Record Book competition and I conquered my challenge,” she said. This year Kaylee Jo won in the Utilizing Science and Technology field with her Veterinarian Science project. “I encourage all youth to set and work toward a goal and give it everything you’ve got because eventually it will pay off,” said Kaylee Jo.
For Kaylee Jo it paid off big. “I will be receiving a $1,500 scholarship to the college of my choice, plus a trip to National Congress in Atlanta, GA in November,” she said.
Community-minded young lady

Kaylee Jo Guthrie

Kaylee Jo Guthrie


Kaylee Jo was able to represent three different organizations with one trip to Blanchard Springs Caverns in March. She was able to make a public appearance and spread the word about America’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization. As a member of the Izard County Drug and Tobacco Coalition, she picked up cigarette butts around the park and educated others on the dangers of tobacco. As a 4-H’er she used her leadership abilities in team building activities. Above all else, she set a positive example for others to follow and wore her beautiful smile all day long.
“I had an amazing day at Blanchard Springs Caverns with close to 100 4-H’ers from several different counties. We went on the Dripstone Cave tour, picked up cigarette butts at the park, went on a hike, learned about water pollution, and made ice cream in a bag. I was glad I was given the opportunity to represent three major organizations in my life, 4-H, ANTSO, and the Izard County Drug Coalition team. I really enjoyed leading some of the group activities and setting a good example for those around me,” said Kaylee Jo.
ANTSO stands for American’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization and is the organization in which Kaylee Jo represents the State of Arkansas. This is the 46th year for ANTSO and is currently directed by Jenny Telar. ANTSO represents all 50 states and offers young ladies a pageantry that weighs heavily on academics, community service, and leadership abilities.
The 2016 America’s National Teenager Scholarship Organization pageant will be held July 26 through August 1.
Kayle Jo stated, “As many of you know I will be competing for America’s National Teenager. One of the awards given is People’s Choice, the girl with the most likes and views on her video wins. I would really appreciate if you would open this link, watch my video, like it and then share it with your friends. Thank you all so much for all the support and encouragement I have received from all of you along the way.” Kaylee Jo’s video may be viewed at https://youtu.be/yBLpPgGW_rI. The more likes Kaylee Jo receives on her video, the more likely she is to win People’s Choice.
America’s National Teenager is the longest running premier pageant for teens in the United States. Founded in 1970, America’s National Teenager has graced the cover of magazines, television and national media as a role model of leadership, scholastic aptitude and service. Combining the elements of glamour, scholarship, style and service, ANTSO State and National Programs draw on a positive approach to pageantry that implements a scoring system focusing on a “real girl”. With no swimsuit or mandatory talent competition, ANTSO focuses on a typical teen in daily life. Contestants are judged in five categories: 30% Interview, 15% Evening Gown, 15% Personal Expression (contestants decorate a pair of blue jeans and model them, a trademarked category of ANTSO), 15% School (academics and school awards/excellence), 15% Activities (leadership, extra-curricular activities and community service), 10% Onstage Question.
ANTSO has awarded more than $102 million scholarships since its creation. America’s National Teenager continues to set high standards for excellence by awarding nearly $100,000 in scholarships at every state competition each year.
All National and State winners are awarded in-kind scholarships from sponsoring universities and the opportunity to serve as positive role models to teens across America. ANTSO holds to the highest standards of quality and integrity and conducts all competitions in a fair and unbiased manner.

Authorities have arrested two suspects that were involved in a theft of a church van in Horseshoe Bend plus additional thefts in Horseshoe Bend, Elizabeth, and Cave City.
Early Sunday morning, July 10, staff of the First Baptist Church in Horseshoe Bend reported to authorities that the church building had been broken into and that items including a guitar and the church van were stolen.
While Lt. Charles Melton, Sgt. Gabe Sanders and Horseshoe Bend assigned deputies were investigating, they developed at least two people of interest, located the guitar, and continued the investigation. During this investigation, it was reported that Doty Family Funeral Home of Horseshoe Bend had a van damaged. Someone had attempted to hotwire the vehicle that same night.
On July 11, Lt. Melton learned that his prime suspect had been arrested in Cave City. The suspect had fled from Cave City Police and had shot at them before wrecking the vehicle he was driving. Mac Ryan Chitwood, age 26 of Horseshoe Bend, currently in the Sharp County Jail, has been charged in Izard County in connection with the church and funeral home events. An Elizabeth man, 18 year old Dalton Michael Pflaumer, has also been arrested and incarcerated in the Baxter County Detention Center on felony charges related to the burglary of a private residence, vehicle thefts, and other thefts.
The events leading up to the arrest of Pflaumer came about in the early hours of July 11, when the Baxter County Sheriff’s Office was notified that officers in Sharp County had been involved in a vehicle pursuit with a 2001 Volvo V10 driven by Chitwood. It was determined that the registered owners of the vehicle involved in that pursuit reside in the St. Louis, Missouri area but have a vacation home in Baxter County on Diamond Bay Road. The owners were contacted and stated that their vehicle should still be parked at their residence on Diamond Bay Road, and indicated they had not been at that residence since July 5. Later that same morning, Corp. Kristofer Savino went to the residence on Diamond Bay Road and found that it had been burglarized. Items missing from the residence, in addition to their 2001 Volvo V10, were a handgun and a shotgun. It appeared that people had been squatting in the residence for a period of time. Entry had been made through the back door of the house.
Chitwood, who had been apprehended in Sharp County, told authorities there that he and another person had stolen a white van belonging to the First Baptist Church in Horseshoe Bend. He indicated the pair had travelled in the stolen church van to the Hand Cove area in Baxter County. They had concealed the stolen van in a heavily wooded area approximately one mile away from the residence they chose to burglarize.
Chitwood and Pflaumer parted company in the Brockwell area of Izard County after leaving the residence in the stolen Volvo. The vehicle pursuit involving Chitwood driving the stolen Volvo in Sharp County occurred afterwards.
The Baxter County Sheriff’s Office utilized its helicopter on the evening of July 11 to fly over the Hand Cove/Diamond Bay area in an attempt to locate the stolen and abandoned church van. After flying over the area for several minutes, the van was spotted from the air through dense foliage. The van was subsequently towed and removed for evidentiary processing.
In addition to the burglary investigation, the Sheriff’s Office had taken reports the previous day, July 10, that a private boat dock near Baxter CR 863, in the same area, had been entered and several items were stolen from the dock and from boats in the dock. These included speakers, binoculars, and fishing equipment. A cellphone was found on one of the boats. This cellphone was found to belong to Pflaumer. According to reports,

Pflaumer

Pflaumer

Chitwood

Chitwood

Pflaumer was located on July 12, admitted to committing the crimes with the other suspect, and helped investigators locate and recover some of the stolen items.
As to the funeral home, both Chitwood and Pflaumer have been charged with breaking and entering, a class D felony; and criminal mischief, a class D felony. Relating to the church, both have been charged with commercial burglary and theft of property, both class D felonies. The pair have an Izard County Circuit Court date of August 10. Pflaumer remains in custody in lieu of a $50,000 bond.

skidmoreSavannah Skidmore (r), 21-year old daughter of Jerry and Kim Skidmore of Calico Rock and a junior at the University of Arkansas, was selected as first runner-up in the 79th Annual Miss Arkansas Scholarship Pageant at Bank of the Ozarks Arena in Hot Springs recently. The pageant featured 42 contestants from the state of Arkansas. The girls competed for $121,800 in scholarship funds. Skidmore received a $10,000 scholarship sponsored by Charles and Susie Morgan for being chosen as first runner-up in the competition. Skidmore tied with Savvy Shields, Miss Heart of the Ozarks, in Lifestyle and Fitness in Swimsuit, and was awarded a $1,000 scholarship. Pictured (l to r) is Shields; Reigning Miss Arkansas, and Top 15 Miss America Semi-Finalist, Loren McDaniel; Preliminary Artistic Expression in Talent award winner, Miss North Central Arkansas Rebecca Zurcher; and Skidmore.
Photo/Ashley George

The Arkansas Spring Nationals racing event will be held at Batesville Motor Speedway on Friday, March 25 and Saturday, March 26.
ICMA Modifieds and Street Stock will race, ICMA sanctioned National, State and Track Points. There is no entry fee.
Total purse for both days is $23,000. For ICMA Mods, there is $1,000 to win; for Street Stock, there is also $1,000 to win.
Pit gates open at 4 p.m. each day; hot laps start at 7 p.m.; races start at 7:30 p.m.; pit passes $30 each day.
Grandstands open at 5:30 p.m. with an admission of $10 each day; kids 14 and under are free.
Batesville Motor Speedway is located at 5090 Heber Springs Road, Locust Grove, AR 72550; seven miles west of Batesville. Call the track for more information at 870-251-0011; for promotions and tickets, call 870-613-1337. Visit BMS website at www.batesvillemotorspeedway.net or email them at csstarr2@yahoo.com.

horseshoeclinic
TIME FOR A CHANGE: The Horseshoe Bend Health Services Board voted on February 26 to turn their remaining account funds over to the city, to be maintained in a separate account for building maintenance. A storage shed will be purchased and roof will be replaced with the proceeds from selling the medical equipment. The building and land will be deeded to the city. “It is with sadness and resignation that the board made this decision,” said Jodie Huckaby, President. “Medical policies have changed, and it is hard for a clinic to succeed.” Two clinics in the last year and one half have closed at the location, after years of the building sitting empty. The city will be leasing the building to the Horseshoe Bend Area Chamber of Commerce, housing a Chamber Visitor and Information Center, and a small museum on the history of Horseshoe Bend. See full story in the March 16 edition of the Pacesetting Times.

kab(small)
Arkansans statewide are encouraged to spruce up their communities by volunteering in the Keep America Beautiful Great American Cleanup in Arkansas. This year’s spring cleanup campaign, coordinated and promoted by the Keep Arkansas Beautiful Commission, KAB, begins March 1 and continues through May 31.
Everyone in Horseshoe Bend is encouraged to participate in this year’s Keep Horseshoe Bend Beautiful Great American Cleanup. Civic groups, clubs, organizations, scouts, churches, individuals, businesses, and neighborhoods can put together a volunteer crew and pitch in on May 7 and help cleanup. There will be a Hot Dog Picnic to follow. All Horseshoe Benders are encouraged to take part in the annual community cleanup initiative.
Those interested in organizing a cleanup event or volunteering, please call Event Coordinators Michelle Grabowski, City Hall, at 870-670-5113; or Carrie Johnson, Pacesetting Times, at 870-670-6397.
“The Great American Cleanup is an excellent opportunity for Arkansans to make a positive impact on the environment, the state and their local communities,” said Elizabeth Philpott, KAB volunteer program manager. “We encourage everyone to participate in a local event or sign up to coordinate an event.”
Horseshoe Bend is an attractive community, and all residents have a responsibility to keep it clean and attractive. If Horseshoe Bend is littered and ill kept, its potential to attract industry and tourism can be greatly impacted.
A fresh coat of paint, a few new flower plantings, roadsides and waterways free of litter can make a big difference in Horseshoe Bend’s future.
Below are some of the things you can do as a church, business, or civic group to be a sponsor.
– Freshen up your parking lot, roadsides, and ditches;
– Plant a flower bed;
– Add potted flowers or plants to your entrance;
– Recycle Items produced by your church, business, or civic group that are accepted by Horseshoe Bend Recycling Center;
– Prune trees and bushes;
– Add a fresh coat of paint if needed;
– Put together a volunteer crew and pitch in on May 7.
Updated information on where volunteers will meet to sign up and what supplies volunteers will need to bring will be published in the Pacesetting Times as we get closer to the clean-up date.
KAB works with cleanup coordinators to plan and publicize their local events, and provide volunteers with Glad® trash bags, gloves, safety vests and other cleanup supplies.

stpattybbq
by Tammy Curtis
What better way to welcome warmer weather than barbecue? For the third year, organizers of the Sidney St. Patrick’s Day Parade will share their event with the season’s first barbecue competition during the town’s festivities on Saturday, March 19.
Local barbecue connoisseur Carl Bailey, one of the judges of the world famous Memphis BBQ Network competition, helped get the cook-off going, after being contacted by Sidney native Justin Davis. Bailey recalls how the renowned Memphis competition began with a bunch of backyard barbecue guys and has grown over the years to be part of the mid-south competition circuit. Bailey and Davis expect to see the Sidney event grow, after starting with 11 teams in 2014. This year, they hope to see double the number of competitors. Party Q from Memphis set up last year, as did a local team Slaughterhouse BBQ, and organizers hope to continue to see a range of chefs, pros to backyard cooks. After the competitors finish their variety of mouth watering meats and are judged, samples will be offered to the parade crowd.
The contest entry form is available online at www.sidneywaterworks.com/bbq.htm. Cash prizes will be awarded for first through third place in each category based on the number of entries. Bailey explained the competition is based on a points system with ribs and butt entries getting the highest point value. He added back yard cookers should not be intimidated by the professional teams, as amateurs beat the pros in some of the categories last year.
Starting this year, the Grand Champion Trophy will be named in honor of Don Taylor, who recently passed away. The owner of Taylor Feed Mill in Franklin was a well known community volunteer who began cooking competitively in 2014 and won a first, second and third place trophy and cash prizes, despite his late start.
His name will live on through the Sidney trophy.
Sidney cook-off participants will check in on Friday, March 18 at the Sidney Ball Park, just off Highway 58, and begin cooking either Friday night or Saturday morning, depending on the length of time required for the meat to cook. Complete rules and judging times are available at www.sidneywaterworks.com/rules.htm. The team is working on a website with downloadable rules, regulations and entry forms. The link will be posted for everyone to share. So invite your friends and come out and enjoy the day in beautiful Sidney.
Business, clubs and organizations interested in joining in the fun can put together teams, set up and compete or set up booths at the event. The group is also looking for corporate sponsorships to help with prizes and awards. Businesses contributing will be listed on the team’s shirts which will be available for sale as well as banners at the barbecue cook-off. For more information on these great opportunities, drop an email to: sidneyarbbq@gmail.com or contact Carl Bailey at 870-283-2272, or Tammy Curtis at 870-283-2132.

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The Pacesetting Times Christmas edition is this week, December 23. Grab yourself a copy of the paper and enjoy Letters to Santa, greetings from area businesses, Christmas Parade and Santa photos, and much more!

Handbags for Homeless Women is a non-profit organization that Crystal Pinson, of Salem, started less than two weeks ago. While still in the beginning stages of the mission, the response from the surrounding communities has been tremendous.
Pinson lives in Salem with her husband the three sons. “I was inspired to do this mission when I heard about an organization providing shoes for the homeless,” said Pinson. “I realized some of the struggles that came from being a woman on the streets,” she added. The mission fills handbags with fruit snacks, feminine hygiene products, personal care trial size items, etc. for homeless women. Since Handbags for Homeless Women is such a new mission, purses and personal care items are still needed. After the purses are filled, they will be distributed to Homeless and Domestic Violence Shelters throughout the Ozarks. Drop-off sites are at Expressions Salon, located at 306 Hwy. 62 West in Salem, and All About You Salon, located at 7 Highland Cove Drive in Highland.
Receipts are available upon donation. The mission appreciates any and all help. If you are interested in helping in any way, contact Pinson at handbagsforhomelesswomen@yahoo.com or follow Handbags for Homeless Women on Facebook.

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Texting while driving is a problem. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported that in 2012, driver distraction was the cause of 18% of all fatal crashes, with 3,328 people killed, and crashes resulting in an injury, with 421,000 people hurt.
Despite knowing the risks of texting while driving, 43% of teens admit to texting while driving. However, there is an opportunity to change this behavior. Ninety percent of teen drivers say they would stop if a friend in the car asked them and 78% say that they are likely not to text and drive if friends tell them it is wrong.
The Arkansas Newspaper Foundation (ANF), Pacesetting Times, and AT&T are sponsoring and challenging Arkansas students, ages 14 through 19, to write an editorial or opinion column highlighting the dangers of texting while driving and encouraging their peers to take the It Can Wait pledge.
Write an editorial or opinion column about the dangers of texting while driving. Word limit is between 300 and 500, and entry must include student name, daytime phone number, parent/guardian name, school, and English teacher’s name.
The piece will answer the question, “Why is it important to take the It Can Wait pledge to never text and drive.” The piece will highlight the dangers of texting while driving. The piece must include the following call to action, “Take the pledge to never text and drive at ItCanWait.com.”
Submit entries to one of the following, pacesettingtimes@yahoo.com, 703 S. Bend Dr., Horseshoe Bend, or P.O. Box 132, Franklin AR 72536.
The contest deadline is October 28. A local winner will be announced by Pacesetting Times after this date, and will receive $75. Then the entry will be sent to the state level.
A statewide winner will be announced November 13. The winning prize on the state level will include $500, a special guided tour of the state capitol and a dinner for the student and their parents with leadership of AT&T, the ANF and the Pacesetting Times.

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The statewide personal and real estate property tax payment deadline is Thursday, October 15.
County property taxes are used to fund a variety of services in Arkansas including public education, libraries, police and fire, local infrastructure and emergency medical services.
Citizens can avoid penalties and late fees by paying their property taxes over-the-phone before the October 15 deadline.
If you mail your payment make sure it is post marked by October 15 or it will be returned with a 10% penalty.
Izard County Collector Marilyn Downing’s office also accepts Visa and Master Card, but you will be charged a 3.75% convenience fee. The Izard County Collector’s office hours are Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., or you may mail your payment to Izard County Collector, P.O. Box 490, Melbourne AR 72556. The collector’s office is located in the Izard County Annex Building, adjacent to the county courthouse. If you have any questions please call 870-368-7247 or email the collector at izardcollector@centurytel.net.
The Fulton County Collector’s office phone number is 870-895-2457 and customers can pay via phone, or you can mail in your payment to Fulton County Collector, P.O. Box 126, Salem, AR 72576. Office hours are Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and they are open during lunch.
The Sharp County Collector’s office is located at 718 Ash Flat Drive in Ash Flat. Send payment via mail to Sharp County Collector, 718 Ash Flat Drive, Ash Flat, AR 72513; pay online at the Sharp County Tax Collector ePayment Service Site, accepted payment method is with a Visa, MasterCard, American Express, Discover credit card, or an electronic check, the total amount will be adjusted to allow for the electronic processing of the transaction through the state’s eGovernment service provider, Arkansas.gov, taxes paid online will be credited to your account within 48 hours; or call 870-994-7334.
If you mail your payment you will need to include a self addressed stamped envelope or an e-mail address for a receipt.

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Back to School in this week’s issue of the Pacesetting Times includes Izard County Consolidated, Melbourne, Calico Rock and Salem Public Schools. Get your school calendars, meet the upcoming football teams, and watch for sports each week from these schools!

Staff members of the Pacesetting Times won seven state awards in the recent Better Newspaper News-Editorial Contest conducted annually by the Arkansas Press Association.
In the Smaller Weekly Division, Coverage of Education Category, Karen Sherrell, Carrie Johnson and Cassie Stafford won Second Place. Judges comments were, “Dedicated page for education news, what a great thing for your readers; good variety of topics.” Sherrell and Johnson won Third Place for Best Front Page, and Sherrell placed third for her News Story, “One Year Later” about a tornado hitting Horseshoe Bend. Judges comments were, “Good photos to illustrate article.” Johnson received Third Place for a Single Feature Photograph, “Good things come in twos.”
Stafford received an Honorable Mention for her Single Sports Feature Photograph “Salem Teammates” and Bobby Stapleton received Honorable Mentions for Sports News Story, “Greyhounds battle Panthers” and Single Sports Action Photograph “Putting on a show.”
“I’m so proud of our staff and their hard work recognized by the Press Association,” said Sherrell, owner of the newspaper. “It’s wonderful when everybody wins!”
This year 55 Arkansas newspapers submitted 1,874 entries, 20 daily newspapers sent 830 entries, 33 weekly newspapers sent 1,044. Their submissions were then judged by members of the Colorado Press Association.
Locally, the Melbourne Times received Honorable Mention for Picture Page in Medium Weeklies; the Batesville Daily Guard received First Place in General Excellence in Medium Dailies; and the Stone County Leader of Mountain View received Honorable Mention in General Excellence.

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Lee and Tresa Lester, along with their son Clint, were named this year’s Fulton County Farm Family of the Year Award. Congratulations Lester Family! See full story and additional photos in the July 1 edition of the Pacesetting Times. Photo/C.Johnson

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Dr. Adam and Michelle Gray are proud to announce that Gray Family Practice Clinic, PLLC took over ownership and management of the Horseshoe Clinic as of June 8. They are also excited to announce that Family Nurse Practitioner, Marion Conway, will continue to provide comprehensive, high quality care for the entire family, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dr. Gray will be staffing the clinic on Fridays as well. You will be greeted by the same friendly staff at the same phone number and address. They look forward to serving the healthcare needs of you and your family. New patients will be accepted and they will provide integrated healthcare and charting between both the Melbourne and Horseshoe Bend Clinics. All major insurances are accepted, including VA Choice. Gray Family Practice Clinic of Horseshoe Bend is located at 707 Third Street, and can be reached by calling 870-670-5115.
Pictured (l to r) Dr. Adam Gray, Ginny Evans – Receptionist, Susan Walker – Nurse and Marion Conway, Nurse Practitioner. Photo/C.Stafford

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Act 560 of 2015 amended Arkansas laws pertaining to the Public School Choice Act. Act 560 of 2015 went into effect on March 20.
The Act now states that parents must submit school choice applications to the nonresident district by May 1, and the nonresident district shall notify the resident district of the filing of the application.
Under the former school choice law, applications were due by June 1 and parents had the responsibility of providing copies of the application to both the nonresident and resident districts.
The Superintendent of the nonresident district shall notify the parent and resident district in writing as to whether the student’s application has been accepted or rejected on or prior to July 1.
Under the former school choice law, a nonresident school district had to make a determination regarding whether to accept or deny a school choice application by August 1.
You can pick up School Choice Application forms from your schools Superintendent Office, or by printing one offline at www.arkansased.gov.

The 66th Annual Fulton County Homecoming Festival will be held May 22 and 23 in Salem. Festival organizers are now accepting vendors for the Festival Street Market. Rental fees are $75 for Friday night and Saturday or $40 for Saturday only. There is a $10 additional charge for electricity. No commission is charged on sales and rental fees will not be refunded in case of rain. Booths are ten feet wide and the depth of a parking space.
All food vendors must meet the Arkansas Department of Health guideline must be inspected by Health Department officials. All vendors must meet the Arkansas sales tax regulations.
Applications are available online at the Salem Chamber of Commerce, www.SalemAR.com or contact Tonya at 870-371-0887.

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The 25th Annual Buddy Bass Tournament on April 25, will benefit the Friends of Horseshoe Bend Animals. Held on 640 acre Crown Lake in Horseshoe Bend, the tournament is being presented by Box Hound Marina, Resort and R.V. Park. Box Hound Marina will be the headquarters and host for the event. Tournament hours are from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Entry fees will be $50 per boat (two person maximum in boat). There will be an optional Big Bass entry of $5 per person. Drawings for door prizes are held after the official weigh in. All proceeds from the entries will be donated to Friends of Horseshoe Bend Animals.
The annual Buddy Bass Tournament began 24 years ago upon the request of local fishermen and was then known as the Dogwood Days Buddy Bass Tournament. The tournament has consistently grown with six boats showing up that first year to an average of about 35 boats and is run with less formality than most big league tournaments. One of the main differences is that the take off is done by drawing numbers versus the date the entries were received. Many of the years have seen pontoon boats mixed in with the decked out bass boats. Contestants are mainly AR and MO residents. Box Hound Marina, Resort and R.V. Park, 870-670-4496, is a full-service marina, resort, and R.V. Park located on spectacular Crown Lake in North-Central Arkansas. In addition to some of the finest bass fishing in Arkansas, there are endless water sports to enjoy including pontoon boats, swimming, or just relaxing outside the resort’s cabins or R. V. Park. Box Hound is truly a natural jewel nestled in the boot heel of the Arkansas Ozarks. The owners have created a very relaxing and family oriented resort which is unparalleled anywhere. If you are looking for a quiet, beautiful, and non-pressured place in which to relax visit Crown Lake and experience Box Hound. See full story in the April 1 edition of the Pacesetting Times!

Horseshoe Bend’s annual publication, the Horseshoe Review is now in process.
Clubs, groups, organizations, and churches are encouraged to begin compiling your news and photos for the Review, which will be published in April.
Information may be turned in at the Horseshoe Bend Area Chamber of Commerce office at the lower Diamond B Mall, or email pacesetting@centurytel.net with Review typed in the subject line.
“This will be the 36th edition of the Horseshoe Review and we look forward to publishing a beautiful glossy magazine again this year,” said Karen Sherrell, Review Chairman. Each Review features a message from the Chamber President and from the mayor, with articles in the past from area organizations such as the Kiwanis Club, American Legion, MRID, Airport Commission, Boating and Fishing Club, SRAA, AARP, Men’s and Ladies Golf Clubs, Recycling Center, Garden Club, Horseshoe Pitching, Animal Control, Telecare, DAR, Little Theater, Pioneer Village-Manor Homes, Music in the Mountains, Izard County Master Gardeners, as well as local church news, Chamber festivals and school information.
Area businesses place advertisements in the Review as well and a sales representative will be calling businesses within the next month.
So let’s get working on your news to publish in the annual Review, and remember to highlight your group’s activities for the year, a little history, and a picture or two. For more information, please call Sherrell at 870-670-6397.

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For the 31st year, FNBC Bank will award the Boyd Carpenter Scholarship to a graduating high school senior from Sharp, Izard or Fulton County who plans to attend college and seek a four year degree. FNBC Bank partners with the Arkansas Community Foundation to fund this $4,000 scholarship.
Awarded in a two-phase process, the first phase places emphasis on academics, extracurricular activities and employment.
The second phase is based upon the applicant’s interview with the judging committee. The scholarship will be awarded as $1,000 per year for four years for a total of $4,000.
Students interested in applying should visit www.arcf.org/scholarships to complete the online application. All applications are due by April 1.
This scholarship is renewable up to four years. To qualify, students must maintain a 2.5 GPA on a four point scale, or equivalent.
The FNBC Bank Board of Directors established this scholarship in 1984 to honor Boyd Carpenter, then-chairman and president of the bank, who was a devoted advocate for education. Carpenter’s son, Martin, currently serves as chairman and CEO, and his granddaughter, Molly, is director of marketing.

Graduating seniors in Fulton County who have participated in county, district, or state fairs have the opportunity to apply for three scholarships, the Fulton County Fair Foundation Scholarship, the North Central Arkansas District Fair Billy Ray Nix Memorial Scholarship, and the Arkansas Fair Manager’s Association Scholarship. Applications are available online at www.fultoncountyfair.org and should be completed and turned into the Fulton County Fair Office at least five days before the deadline listed on the application. This will give fair officials time to get the scholarship applications to the appropriate scholarship committee. The scholarship applications can be completed online and printed for submission. All applications must be typed.
All scholarship applications should be submitted to the Fulton County Fair office. The North Central Arkansas District Fair Billy Ray Nix Memorial Scholarship is due by February 26. The Arkansas Fair Managers Association Scholarship is due by March 10, and the Fulton County Fair Foundation Scholarship is due March 26. If you have questions, please contact Fulton County Fair Manager Carolyn Lewis at clewis@fultoncountyfair.org or call the fair office at 870-895-5565.

The Knights of Columbus will host a Indoor Rummage Sale at Saint Mary of the Mount Catholic Church in Horseshoe Bend on Friday, November 14, and Saturday, November 15 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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Horseshoe Bend will hold their Fall Citywide Yard Sale on Saturday, September 6 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. To be put on the list call the Horseshoe Bend Chamber of Commerce office at 870-670-5433. The sign up deadline is Wednesday, September 3, at 3 p.m. The lists will be given out the morning of the sale.

The North Arkansas Electric Cooperative, NAEC, in Salem will hold their Annual Meeting on Thursday, August 14 at the Salem High School.
All registered members will be eligible to win a 50” flat screen HD television, you do not have to be present to win.
All registered members who attend the meeting will be eligible to win a 2006 GMC Sierra 4X4 retired service truck. Registration cards for members were mailed out in the middle of July with NAEC’s 2013 annual report.
To facilitate quick registration be sure to bring the registration card to the Annual Meeting.
Registration will be held from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., BBQ meal will be served from 3:45 to 6 p.m., and the Business Session will begin at 6:30 p.m.

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SIXTY YEARS: On Monday, July 14, Knights of Columbus Council, Father Conan Mawhorr, 10493 of Horseshoe Bend, honored Knight Daniel Bye for his 60 years of service with the Knights of Columbus. A proclamation from the Arkansas State Deputy Adrian Dominguez proclaiming Dan’s service to one and service to all. District Deputy Tim Malloy and Grand Knight David made the presentation of a Certificate and Glass paperweight in honor Dan’s 60 years of service.

Celtic Breeze Band and the U.S. Forest Service invite you to attend Celtic in the Caverns, a concert featuring Scottish and Irish music played from one of the worlds most impressive natural stages, the Great Cathedral Room at Blanchard Springs Caverns, just north of Mountain View.
Show times are Saturday, March 15 at 2 and 5 p.m., and Sunday, March 16 at 2 p.m.
Tickets are $20 cash or $21 credit. Price includes admission to the cavern stage, but does not include the full cave tour.
Tickets and information are available at For Mother Earth, located on Main Street in Mountain View or by calling 870-585-2406.
Seating is limited to 100 per show.

The Izard County Animal Resue Effort is holding its 11th Annual Paws and Claws Rummage Sale on Friday and Saturday, February 21 and 22, at the Izard County Fairground Exhibit Building in Melbourne. This is the largest rummage sale around, and it is all inside!
Concessions will be available with hot dog and hamburger lunches, chili, drinks and baked goods.
On Saturday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., there will also be a pet vaccinations clinic, with Nanci Solis of Thousand Hills Vet Service, where you can bring your dogs on a leash and/or cats in a carrier, and get your pets vaccinated at a reduced cost. Rabies vaccination will be $10. Nail trimming and other vet related services will also be available.
Come on out, have lunch, buy some treasure, and support a great cause!

In honor of American Heart Month in February, Ozarks Medical Center is offering free heart health screenings at its rural health clinics during the last week of February, 24 through 28. The screening includes a cholesterol panel and blood pressure check.
Participants in the cholesterol screening should not eat or drink for eight hours prior in order to receive accurate results on the blood test. The screenings are free but appointments are required and may be made by contacting the clinic. Individuals do not need to be a patient of the clinic to participate.
OMC rural health clinic locations include:
Mammoth Spring Medical Clinic: 870-625-3228
Salem 1st Care, Salem, Arkansas: 870-895-1911
Thayer Medical Clinic: 417-264-7136
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. One in every four deaths in the United States is the result of heart disease.
“American Heart Month is an excellent time to make an important decision to do everything you can to reduce your risk factors for heart disease,” said M. Faisal Khan, MD, OMC Interventional Cardiologist “Early detection of risk factors and lifestyle changes can reduce your risk and this screening event is the place to get information to help you embark on a healthier lifestyle.”
In addition to the rural health clinic screenings, a free event will be held at OMC Heart Care Services in West Plains from 7 to 11 a.m. Feb. 14 and will include a free cholesterol panel and blood pressure screen as well as peripheral arterial disease, PAD, check. Appointments are required and can be made by calling 417-257-6793. The screenings for PAD are limited to persons with high risk. Risk for PAD will be assessed when making a screening appointment.
OMC will also host a Heart Health Breakfast at 7:30 a.m. Feb. 12 in the OMC Willard Hunter Classroom at Parkway Center. The breakfast is free but a reservation is required and may be made by calling 417-257-6793.

For your rummage sale donating convenience, ICARE will have its trailer parked at the Corner Drug Store parking lot in Melbourne. The door will be open, please just place your items inside. Donated dog and/or cat food would be most appreciated too.
Thank you in advance for your continued generosity.
Do not forget, ICARE Rummage Sale is February 21 and 22 at the fairgrounds.

This year represents a mid-term election nationally, and local county and municipal office seats are up for grabs.
County positions of Sheriff, Judge, Justices of the Peace, Assessor, Collector, Treasurer, Coroner, and Constable will be voted on this year.
Candidates with a party affiliation begin filing on Monday, February 24 at noon for a one-week period ending at noon on March 3.
Party pledges, if any, and affidavits of eligibility shall be filed, and any filing fees of a political party shall be paid at the courthouse of the county in which candidates are filing for office.

Free GED evening classes are currently available at the following locations:
Calico Rock City Hall Tuesdays 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Mammoth Spring Ozarka College Thursdays 4:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Cave City Middle School Mondays and Tuesdays 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Mountain View Ozarka College Wednesdays 5 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Registration is ongoing.
For additional information on these and other classes, call the Ozarka College Adult Education Department at 1-800-821-4335, ext. 2051 or in Izard County call 870-368-2051.
Ozarka College’s Adult Education program is ADA accessible, EEOC compliant and disability accommodations are available upon request.

Safe Passage, Inc. Thrift Store in Melbourne announces a “Bag Sale” every Wednesday through the end of February. Each bag is $1 for items from the women’s and children’s rooms. Limit eight items per bag. Books, hardcover, paperback and children’s, are 10 for $1.
“This is an opportunity for shoppers to visit our store and see what we have to offer,” said Executive Director Lora Umphries-Buck. “The income from our Store supports Safe Passage, Inc. domestic violence programs. These include a 24/7 Crisis Hotline, peer counseling, shelter for victims of Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault and other free and confidential services.”
Safe Passage, Inc. Thrift Store is on Highway 69 East of the traffic light in Melbourne. The store is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. If you or someone you know is being abused, call our 24-hour hotline 870-368-3222 for free and confidential help.

The 18th Annual Food Drive sponsored by the Pacesetting Times is now underway.
“Join us again this Holiday season in helping your neighbors and friends,” said Karen Sherrell, publisher of Pacesetting Times. Donate two or more non-perishable food items and receive a free classified ad that can be used anytime, from now until March 31, 2014.
“We will deliver donated food items through December 13 to the Food Pantry in Horseshoe Bend,” said Sherrell. The Food Pantry is located behind the Assembly of God Church.
Stop by Pacesetting Times at 703 South Bend Drive in Horseshoe Bend with your food donations, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. from now until December 13. Limit one classified ad per family.

Join the Horseshoe Bend Public Library for their Summer Reading Program. Programs will be held on Thursdays, June 6 through July 11, starting at 11 a.m. There will not be a meeting on July 4. The Summer Reading program is for children ages 5 to 12, and the library will have some special activities.
The program will explore things underground. Activities will include special guests, read-a-book, puppet shows, plays, fun crafts, prizes, incentives and much more.
If you are a parent and your child or children have never attended our Summer Reading Program, it would be a great opportunity to introduce them to the library and the importance of reading, plus all the fun they will have. Snacks and a light lunch will be served.
Mothers with small children are encouraged to join us. Call 870-670-4318, or drop in the library at 9 Club Road, Horseshoe Bend, to register. The library is open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on Saturday 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Visit them online at horseshoebendpubliclibrary.webs.com.

Spring River Home Health, SRHH, has been in business since April 1, 1981 with administrator, Connie Brays.
SRHH has been serving the tri-county area with caring and dependable home health service for 32 years. They have 24 staff members that are there to provide care and support to residents and their families in the comforts of their homes.
SRHH is a private non-profit Home Health Agency serving patients in Fulton, Izard, and Sharp Counties. They accept insurances of all kinds. The agency also offers skilled nursing, physical therapy, speech therapy, occupational therapy and home health aide services.
Their staff manages wound vac, entral feedings, wound care, IV therapy, medicine management, diabetic teaching and any other care a physician sees fit. Spring River Home Health is here for its communities.
The business is located at 121 South Pickren Street in Salem and may be contacted at 870-895-2627 or 888-830-6389.

On Sunday, September 2, the Horseshoe Bend Police Department, received a call reporting a possible death on Clarke Lane in Horseshoe Bend.
Sgt. Sonny Gerringer arrived on the scene at 8:14 a.m., and identified the deceased as Nicholas A. Bailey, age 32, of Franklin.
Izard County Coroner Eddie Howard pronounced Bailey dead on arrival. His body has been sent to the Crime Lab in Little Rock. There is no reported cause of death as of Monday, Sept. 10 according to Police Chief Fred Mitchell. Reports of Bailey’s involvement in an altercation at a local night club the evening before his death are currently under investigation.