CLEANING UP: Prisoners from the Arkansas Department of Corrections North Central Unit in Calico Rock, were cleaning up the ditch lines along Lacrosse Road on Friday, January 20. Izard County Judge Eric Smith said he planned on having the prisoners clean up the roadway as long as he could. Photo/C.Stafford

CALLING ALL ARTISTS! OPEN STUDIO
Arts Center of North Arkansas (ACNA)
TUESDAY NIGHTS – FROM 5:30 TO 7:30 – JAN 31.
In the Cherokee Village Mall. Come join the fun –
Bring any project you’re interested in DRAWING – PAINTING – CRAFTING – QUILTING – SCRAPBOOKING – EMBROIDERY…..
Learn, laugh, experiment, visit, share, see what others are doing, enjoy. Bring your own supplies, drinks, snacks – hot chocolate sounds good. Contact – Marty Williams – 870-257-5661 – for more information.
The Arts Center will be closed during inclement weather.

by Ron Yow
The January Music in the Mountains Show will be held on Saturday, January 28.
Normally the show is on the third Saturday but we have had to change the date. Be sure and mark your calendar of this change! Our guests for the January show are a couple of locals.
A few months ago, The Loft held a singing contest with some very talented singers.
We were able to get the first and second place winners to come and perform with us, Randy Campbell and Kelly Smith.
Campbell is a local who grew up up Franklin. He has been singing since he was able to speak and loves country music.
Smith lives right here in Horseshoe Bend and is best known around town as the Animal Control Officer. Smith is a very talented singer and enjoys singing a wide array of music.
This is a show you will not want to miss. So remember the date, January 28. The doors will open at 5 p.m. with Marty McKnight cooking hot dogs and hamburgers on the grill. The girls will be inside to help with your hunger needs.
The show will begin at 6 p.m. Come on out for an evening of good food, good fellowship and lots of good music. Admission is by donation.
We want to thank our corporate sponsor, FNBC, for their continued support. Hope to see you all Saturday, January 28.

Royalty at the Izard County Consolidated Homecoming on Friday, January 13 at Brockwell. Photo/B.Stapleton

A Violet Hill woman and her two children were arrested January 13 during ICC’s Homecoming Basketball game at the Brockwell campus.
Izard County Sgt. Mark Simino was approached by Kristen Lynn Hennigan, age 32, who stated that her daughter had been victimized previously at the school. Simino reported that school officials had addressed the situation but Hennigan was not satisfied with the action taken. At that time, he directed Hennigan to School Resource Officer Bret Stephenson.
A short time later, Simino observed Stephenson conversing with the mother and two juveniles. Hennigan and her children were directed to the south side of the lobby near the entrance by school staff.
She was exhibiting extreme agitation and was thrusting her hands and arms about in a protesting manner, according to the incident report.
Simino was summoned by school officials to again assist with the family, who had been directed to leave the building because of their public display of inappropriate outbursts, and their threatening actions toward another student. They refused to comply with the direction to leave the building.
The male juvenile, age 13, attempted to prevent Simino from physically directing Hennigan out of the building, and the female juvenile, age 12, was yelling at officers. Hennigan continued to obstruct the actions of the officer, and was yelling and escalating the situation.
A physical confrontation by Hennigan and her children led to the arrest of all three. A physical struggle with the mother and the juveniles continued as the three were removed from the building by Simino, Stephenson and Probation and Parole Officer Ryan Walker.
When the male juvenile was placed in the patrol car, he shattered the passenger side rear window and continued to yell out threats and insults toward the deputies.
The juveniles were each charged with disorderly conduct and the male juvenile was additionally charged with criminal mischief. Both were transported to the Juvenile Detention Facility in Batesville. Hennigan was charged with disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and contributing to the delinquency of a minor.
She was transported to the Izard County Detention Facility where she remains in lieu of $3,800 bond,and has a court date of February 19.

(January 25, 2017)

JoAnn Lowrie
Photo/C.Stafford


by Cassie Stafford
JoAnn Lowrie is retiring after 22 years working with the Head Start and NADC programs in Salem.
Lowrie began working at Head Start in 1992 and worked until 1998. She then took a few year’s break and had her own in-home daycare, and then she returned to “the front side of the building” as she called it. In 2000, she began in the Management position at NADC in Fulton County.
Lowrie was born in Salem in 1962 and graduated from Highschool in 1980. She then moved to Little Rock and started college. While in Little Rock, she attended a Jr. College and also UALR. She met her husband and married him in 1981, had two boys, Robert and James, and moved back to Salem in 1990 when Robert started kindergarten. She received her Child Development Associate license at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro.
In 1991 the Head Start Program was a home based program, and in 1992, the program was going to center based. “It was a threat that Salem wouldn’t have a Head Start program because they couldn’t find a building,” said Lowrie. With her son, James, being in the program and being a Head Start parent at the time, Lowrie thought, “We can’t just let these kids be dropped.” Lowrie began to help look around for a building and talked to Cord Mosley who owned the property that the Head Start program is in. Head Start opened the center in December of 1992 and Lowrie served as the Assistant Teacher.
Looking back on what she enjoyed most in the 22 years, Lowrie said, “Head Start will always be in my heart, because just watching the kids when they would master tying their shoes, or being able to count to ten. Those little milestones and that little lightbulb would go off, and their face and their little eyes lit up. It would just be awesome.” She also enjoyed working with the parents because they would also set goals for the parents to obtain. “Just being involved in that family was a big plus.”
Lowrie also really enjoyed the Energy Assistance Program. “Our elderly and handicapped live on such a small income, sometimes it makes a difference in eating or medicine.” Lowrie explained that over the years, she has seen some people that are “too proud” to ask for help, but that she encourages people who need the help to take advantage of it, that way they can afford their medicine and food.
She explained that another aspect that she loved about the job was being able to refer people. Sometimes people call and just don’t know where to turn, so Lowrie tries to find the help that they need. Even if NADC is out of funds, she tries to lead people in the right direction they need to be in, and give them that little bit of hope. At times, when funds have been tight, she had to cover two counties. In 2016, Lowrie covered Fulton and Izard County and had to split four days between the two counties.
“I think God put me here, in this job, I really do,” said Lowrie. “Growing up, we didn’t always have the money, so I understand. It’s not an embarrassment to need the help, but if you don’t ask you can’t get it.”
Lowrie said something that has impressed her the past few years is that Fulton County Judge Darrell Zimmer has been the only Judge that she knows of that has helped unload the commodity truck. “It amazes me that he always stands in there and is in the assembly line unloading the boxes.”
After retirement, Lowrie said her main goal right now is to get her husband well, who has been dealing with some health issues since December 2016. “The main thing is just to be there for him. I also have four beautiful grandchildren; Peyton, Alex, Brooklyn and Jace.” Lowrie is looking forward to just being able to spend some time with her grandchildren outdoors. “They all love to be outdoors,” she said.
Lowrie loves scrapbooking and sewing. She has put her scrapbooking on hold lately, but said she’s ready to get back to it. “To me that’s sort of preserving the history of our family, plus the kids love it,” she said.
She commended Linda Cooper, who has been with NADC for over 40 years, for the good job that she does. “With her vision, this program has really grown. I thank her for giving me the opportunity to start. I appreciate the clients letting me be here in their time of need.”
Libby Hale, who began working at Head Start as a Health and Safety Aide in Fall 2016, was hired on Monday, January 17 to fill Lowrie’s vacant position. The Fulton County office will be open Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Attention all men! Are you a hunk in heels?
The Salem Fifth Grade Class is hosting a Woman-less Beauty Pageant to raise money for the Nathan Jackson family. The pageant will be held at the Salem High School on January 28 at 6 p.m.
The pageant entry fee is $10. Winners will be crowned by donations. This will be a fun event for a great cause. If you would like to enter the pageant or help with the show, please contact Heather Busch at 870-291-1087 or Tiffany Cooper at 870-371-4054.
There will also be a dessert auction (pie, cakes, cookies, cinnamon rolls, etc). If you would like to bake a sweet treat, it would be greatly appreciated.

(January 25, 2017)

North Central Unit, Arkansas Department of Corrections, Calico Rock. Photo/B.Stapleton


by Karen Sherrell
A public meeting was held last November by the Arkansas Department of Corrections North Central Unit, NCU, at Calico Rock.
Prison officials spoke to the residents attending about the various programs at the local facility, such as education, regional maintenance, horse operation, Substance Abuse Education, Canine Unit, garden and forage production, PAL Program, Pre-Release Program, and Paws in Prison Program.
It was reported at the meeting that a potential expansion at the NCU is under consideration, with a plan to house an additional 500 inmates.
The NCU was established in 1990 and employs 179. Described as a medium to minimum security facility, NCU houses, on the average, 840 inmates, or full capacity.
According to Solomon Graves, Public Information Officer and Legislative Liaison with the ADC, in August of 2016, ADC Director Wendy Kelley asked the Board of Corrections for their approval of her to request for funding to expand the North Central Unit at Calico Rock. The Arkansas Board of Corrections is comprised of seven members appointed by the Governor.
The request provided for 576 additional beds at the NCU with an additional 30 Administrative Segregation beds, along with additional Administration and Support Staff offices and programming spaces. The projected size of the expansion is 88,442 sq. ft. and projected cost is $39,283,655.
According to the 2018/19 Capital Projects Request report, eight prison projects throughout the state, including the NCU request, have been submitted to the Board of Corrections, totalling $52,064,199.
In August of 2016, reports stated that the ADC is looking to ease the overcrowding issue in the state’s prison system, with the Board of Corrections asking the governor to approve the expansion of 576 beds at the NCU in Calico Rock.
No projected date of the approval of expansion has been announced.
A report on prison and jail population increases, and specialty courts to ease overcrowding, will be published in next week’s edition.

(January 18, 2017)

Fulton County Sheriff Al Roork


by Karen Sherrell
Fulton County Sheriff Al Roork is no stranger to law enforcement, and after 38 years in the field, he is manning the helm in Fulton County.
Beginning official duties this month, Roork stated he is a realist and humbled to be the new sheriff in town. Not having an opponent at election time, and with the retirement of Sheriff Buck Foley, it is a natural transition of duty for Roork.
“I’m humbled to be sheriff and protect the community,” said Roork. “I’m everybody’s sheriff, and treat everyone equally. I will enforce the law equally and with common sense.”
Roork has seen many changes over the past four decades in law enforcement. “The law is more and more complex now,” he said. “It costs a fortune to operate all the courts we have.” The 16th Judicial District covers five counties, including Fulton County, and Roork has a deep respect for the judges and their jobs. “I have respect for the judges and how hard they try. It’s not easy on their part.” Law enforcement must deal with a ton of paperwork now more than in the past according to Roork. “We respond to calls, but it’s hard to have pro-active law enforcement,” he said. “There’s just not enough staff.” Roork has four deputies and one chief deputy. “I have a great crew. They, like police officers in America, put on a badge and gun everyday. They have a very difficult job, and they’re honest, dedicated people.”
The sheriff appreciates help from the community and stated Fulton County is the best place in the world to live. “There are lots of hard working people here, and I depend on them to trust me, and know that what they tell me is in confidence.”
The hands-on sheriff stated he is a working sheriff, in the field with his officers. “People will see me around,” said Roork. “I love what I do and love helping people.”
Fulton County has from 1,600 to 2,000 county road miles that the sheriff’s office is responsible for. “It’s forty miles across the county,” said Roork. “We are on call 24/7 and ready to go whenever. We work hard for the people and enforce the law.”
“People have no idea of the amount of crime in their community,” said Roork. The hub of all problems he said, is an increase in drug use in the county, of methamphetamine and prescription drugs. “It leads to assault on families, thefts, and loss of productivity.” Roork hopes to slow the escalation of crime. “Burglaries occur every day somewhere in the county.”
The sheriff’s department focuses on each crime, aware of the fact that people are more difficult to deal with these days. “One of the biggest problems today is mental illness and the way it’s dealt with,” said Roork. “It’s time consuming to have a person committed, seeking help. We can help those people that can’t help themselves, and it’s a great feeling to do that,” he added.
The sheriff would like to see a dedicated investigator in the department. “We’re the only county that doesn’t have one,” he said. “Our Chief Deputy was our Investigator, as well as performing his normal duties. It’s just too time consuming.” But the new sheriff will continue to do his job as a working sheriff in the field, alongside his officers, for a community that he loves. “I have no visions of grandeur, we will do our job,” he said.


DECORATING FOR THE HOLIDAYS: Beta Club members decorating a home for the holidays (l to r) Trevor Falco, Sophie Rossitto, Suzonne Harber, Kylie Bell Harber (Beta Club helper), Bailey York, Autumn Freeman, Kendra Rich, Kaylea Walling and Erin Cameron.
The Salem High School Beta Club is at it again. The members of the club stay busy throughout the year, especially in the area of community service.
Throughout the summer, the members of the Beta Club helped the community in several ways. The summer began with members washing school buses so they would be sparkling clean for the upcoming school year. They assisted Holly Pate with the Salem Chamber of Commerce 4th of July event at the park. In August, members parked vehicles during fair week for the Fulton County Fair Association. Several members also helped teachers decorate their classrooms. Some members decorated houses and other buildings for the holidays, and all members helped in providing items for the holidays for several families in Fulton County. You may have noticed some of the members serving hot chocolate, coffee, and cookies at the Salem Christmas Parade. Several members helped the Salem Elementary second grade teachers with their annual second grade literacy night.
At this time, Salem Beta Club is organizing its 8th Annual Bass Tournament. The event is slated for March 11, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Lake Norfork. It takes money and prizes to make this happen, so it is an event that takes all year to organize. Any anglers who would like information may email Kim Harber: kim.harber@salemschools.net or call 870-895-5921. Also, the club will take donations for the event. The club is also involved in upcoming community service. In January, members will help with the benefit auction and fish supper for Nathan and Jean Ann Jackson, that will be at the Izard County Fairgrounds beginning at 4 p.m. on January 14. Each year, the club members visit the nursing home around Valentine’s Day with homemade cards for the residents.
In addition to all of that, several members are traveling to Hot Springs at the end of January to attend the State Beta Club Convention. They will compete in academic and talent competitions and have the opportunity to meet others from all around Arkansas.


by Carrie Johnson
There will be a Benefit Auction and Fish Supper at the Izard County Fairgrounds in Melbourne on Saturday, January 14 for Nathan Jackson.
Jackson suffered a major heart attack on September 16 and has been hospitalized since then. The Fish Supper will begin at 4 p.m. and the Benefit Auction will begin between 5 and 5:30 p.m.
Nathan and his wife, Jean Ann, and two sons, Chance and Spencer, are local residents. Chance and Spencer attend Salem Public Schools.
Nathan has faced and is facing a tremendous amount of rehabilitation due to a brain injury caused by a lack of oxygen. He stayed at Baptist Health Medical Center in Little Rock for 111 days. Sixty-six days were spent in ICU and then 35 at the Rehabilitation Institute. On January 5, he was accepted into Timber Ridge Neuro Restorative Ranch in Benton.
The following is a partial list of items to be auctioned at the benefit: Vic Kalchik’s famous carrot cake, two night stay in a two bedroom cabin at Box Hound Marina in Horseshoe Bend, guitars, gun, jewelry, processed hog (halves) from Everett Bros. Farms in Oxford, luggage set, chainsaws, toolbox, hair cut and style and accessories from Mirror Image, $100 gift certificate and two whole ribeyes from Our Neighborhood Fresh Market in Horseshoe Bend, quilts, three loads of gravel/limestone any size and ten loads of hill dirt (free delivery within 30 miles) from RLH Construction in Salem, Xbox with controllers and over 20 games, gift certificates to area businesses, two rounds of 18 golf with cart (six available) from the Golf Course on Turkey Mountain, one year subscriptions (two available) from Pacesetting Times, 30 games of bowling from Horseshoe Lanes, Avon products, pork butts, tire rotation from Ash Flat Tire and Lube, pictures, frames, baked goods, free rotate and balance from Dennis Lube and Tire in Melbourne, one ton of quality liquid feed and 1-4 wheel lick tank from Harber Livestock and Poultry of Wiseman, Scentsy, Tupperware, air ratchet from O’Reilly’s in Ash Flat, and much more!
Modern Woodmen of America, in Melbourne has donated a $1,000 matching grant.
Anyone having items to donate for this auction may drop them off at the Izard County Sheriff’s Department, 300 Circle Drive in Melbourne, or call Earnie Blackley at 870-373-2999.
Visit on Facebook, Nathan and Jean Ann Gaskins Jackson Benefit, to see items for auction.


by Carrie Johnson
On Thursday, January 5 at approximately 7 a.m., an SUV attempted to pass a stopped bus and struck a child causing minor injuries.
Tyler Little, age 28 of Mount Pleasant, was headed south on State Highway 69 in Mount Pleasant, South Main Street near the intersection of West Road and Pearl Drive, in a 2015 black Jeep Grand Cherokee. Little struck a pedestrian, a seven year old child, that was crossing the highway to board a Melbourne Public School bus driven by Angela Fleming.
Izard County Sheriff’s Department’s Deputy Rusty Ford, Chief Deputy Earnie Blackley and Lt. Charles Melton responded to the scene.
According to Melton’s narrative, “He [Little] stated he was heading south on Highway 69 and the bus was heading north with its yellow lights on, but that it did not have its stop sign or yellow arm out. He said he looked up from the bus and the little boy ran right in front of him.”
When Deputies left the scene of the accident, Melton went to Melbourne Public School to speak with Fleming. “She stated she was stopped with her red lights and stop sign flashing…”
Izard County Deputy Matt Churchwell interviewed several older children that were passengers on the school bus when the accident occurred. According to the report given by Melton, three minor witnesses gave reports which stated that Fleming did in fact have the stop sign flashing, and the black vehicle did not stop.
Little was charged with passing a stopped school bus and first degree assault. He has a February 2 court date.
The minor child struck by Little’s vehicle was transported by Vital Link and Survival Flight to Arkansas Children’s Hospital in Little Rock and was treated for minor injuries. Neither Little nor his minor child passenger sustained injuries.


The Pacesetting Times in Horseshoe Bend is having their Fifth Annual Photo Contest for amateur photography. The deadline for turning pictures in is Tuesday, February 28. There are three categories in this contest.
The first category is Scenery. Do you have a picture that you think is just the prettiest scene ever? Send it in to the paper! Arkansas is The Natural State, and has several beauties!
The second category is Special Moments. This includes pictures of children, for one of those moments that is “just too cute.”
The third category is Animal Lovers. Send in your pictures that are perfect of your pets or any other animal.
The three categories will each have one winner and will receive a prize. The pictures will be judged and the winner from each category will be announced in the March 8 issue of Pacesetting Times. We ask that each family submit only one photo per category.
Each photo submitted will be published in Pacesetting Times intermittently. In order to successfully enter the contest, you must send your name, age, phone number, and a brief description of your picture along with your photo.
You can enter the contest via email at pacesetting@centurytel.net, via mail Pacesetting Times, P.O. Box 132, Franklin, AR, 72536, or drop by our office at 703 S. Bend Drive in Horseshoe Bend. The Pacesetting Times reserves the right to refuse inappropriate photography.


Northcentral Arkansas Development Council, Inc., NADC, is beginning their Winter Regulation Program January 9 and will continue through March 31 or until funds are depleted.
For applicants to be considered in a crisis situation, they are required to have received a shut-off notice date to be with seven days from the date of application.
The following are requirements needed before applications can be taken and processed: proof of income for all household members for the previous month, including verification of any contributions from family and friends; the date and place of current or last employment for all household members; photo ID; proof of child support; proof of utility assistance if applicant receives subsidized housing; copy of an energy bill or receipt from energy supplier, including a receipt stating cost of wood if the applicant’s main heating source is wood, to help NADC make the payment to the correct vendor.
NADC is open from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., and closed from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Wednesday.
Contacts in the tri-county area are, Izard County 870-368-4329, Fulton County 870-895-3628, and Sharp County 870-994-7353. NADC is an Equal Opportunity Employer, EOE.


PROUD FAMILY: (l to r) Howard and Janice Blankenship, Eli Blankenship – American FFA Degree recipient, and Sheila and Danny Blankenship.

by Karen Sherrell
The American FFA Degree is awarded to less than one percent of FFA members, and is one of the organization’s highest honors.
In 2016, the degree was awarded to Izard County Consolidated graduate, Eli Blankenship of Bandmill.
The 2016 American FFA Degree Ceremony was held in Indianapolis, IN on October 22, during the Eighth General Session of the 89th National FFA Convention Expo. Blankenship joined 34 other degree recipients from Arkansas, and 3,790 from throughout the United States, chosen from a national roll of 629,367 FFA members.
The degree is earned by members who have demonstrated the highest level of commitment to FFA and have made significant accomplishments in their agricultural experiences. All of which describe Eli, through years of hard work and commitment.
This degree has also earned him the title of being the first FFA member at Izard County Consolidated Schools to receive the American FFA Degree since Wayne Neal has been the Agri Teacher and FFA Advisor for the past 14 years. “I have had three other FFA members receive national recognition by earning a National FFA Scholarship,” said Neal, adding, “Eli has not only earned this National Degree, but also the pride, respect and honor of his peers, friends and family, as well as the leaders and mentors before him that inspired him to earn this degree.”
And proud his family is. Accompanying Eli to the ceremony in October were his parents, Danny and Sheila Blankenship, and grandparents, Howard and Janice Blankenship.
Highschool graduates may apply for the American FFA Degree one year after their graduation. Eli graduated in 2014, and is currently in his second year at Arkansas Tech in Russellville.
During his first year in highschool, Eli earned his FFA Greenhand Degree, followed by the Chapter degree the next year, and then his State degree. “Eli raised cattle, chickens, and goats and rabbits,” said his mother Sheila. “He also had a community project he had to do.” Eli’s primary agricultural project was cattle, he was on the ICC Show Team, and he served as an FFA Chapter officer.
FFA members utilize the Agricultural Experience Tracker, AET, which is an online record keeping system for agriculture students to record their time worked or money earned with their projects or Supervised Agricultural Experiences, SAE’s. “They also keep records of their FFA activities, officer work, and time in community service, along with other accomplishments and awards,” said Neal. “Utilizing this system is vital for FFA members to earn the degrees, scholarships and awards that they deserve.”
FFA members must apply for the American FFA Degree one year after they graduate, and Eli’s older brother Isaac, a recent graduate of Arkansas Tech in Russellville, encouraged him to apply. “He had all the steps to do it,” said Sheila, “And he worked hard to earn state recognition.”
To earn the American FFA Degree, members must have received the State FFA Degree, and have been an active member for the past three years, with a record of satisfactory participation in activities on the Chapter and State levels. They must have completed the equivalent of at least three years of systematic secondary school instruction in an agricultural education program, and have one full year of enrollment in a postsecondary agricultural program. They must have maintained an operation and records to substantiate an outstanding supervised agricultural experience program, through which they have exhibited comprehensive planning, managerial and financial expertise. They must have earned at least $10,000 and productively invested $7,500, or earned and invested $2,000 and worked 2,250 hours in excess of scheduled class time. In addition to having a record of outstanding leadership abilities and community involvement, they must have achieved a scholastic record of a C or better, and participated in at least 50 hours of community service within at least three different activities.
No easy feat, and that’s why only one percent of the National FFA membership receive the American FFA Degree. Recipients are also awarded the gold American FFA Degree Key, a symbol of the highest achievement of the National FFA organization, and earned by one hard-working young man, Eli Blankenship.


by Cassie Stafford
The Horseshoe Bend City Council meeting was called to order at 6 p.m. on Monday, December 19.
Present were Aldermen Teresa Orrick, Joe Moser, Tom Richardson, Sonny Minze, Marty McKnight, John Grochowski and Ron Yow. Also present was Recorder/Treasurer Michelle Grabowski and City Attorney Jim Short.
All stood for the Pledge of Allegiance and Mayor Bob Barnes led in prayer.
The reading of the minutes were waived by prior council action, Yow moved to approve the November minutes, seconded by Richardson. Motion passed unanimously.
Yow moved to accept the November Treasurer’s Report, seconded by Moser. Motion carried unanimously. Committee Reports were given from the Public Works Department, Sheriff’s Department, Fire Department, Airport Commission, MSID, Code Enforcement, Honorary Police, Building Committee, Finance Committee, Animal Control, Recycling Center and the Library.
Barnes opened and closed the Public Comments portion of the meeting without any comments.
The first item on the agenda under unfinished business was Ordinance 2016-02 (Amending Municipal Code Title 6 Animals and Fowl). Barnes entertained a motion to suspend the rules and place Ordinance 2016-02 on its third and final reading by title only. Yow so moved, seconded by Minze. Motion carried unanimously by roll call vote.
Barnes then entertained a motion to pass Ordinance 2016-02. Yow so moved, seconded by Richardson. Motion carried unanimously by roll call vote.
Barnes entertained a motion to accept the bid from Bethune Painting Inc. of Jonesboro to paint City Hall. Moser so moved, seconded by Grochowski. Motion carried unanimously.
Barnes entertained a motion to place stop signs and warning signs on Ivory Lane by Crown Point Resort. The estimated cost is $400. McKnight so moved, seconded by Moser. All voted in the affirmative with the exception of Yow who voted no. Motion passed.
Under new business, Barnes entertained a motion to approve the 2017 City Finance and City Council meeting schedule. Yow so moved, seconded by Moser. Motion passed unanimously.
Barnes entertained a motion to approve Resolution 2016-08 (To Pass and Approve the Budget for the City of Horseshoe Bend beginning January 1, 2017 through December 31, 2017). Yow so moved, seconded by Moser. Motion passed unanimously.
Luther Yancey and David Seibert appeared before the council to be considered for the position of Alderman in Ward 1 left vacant by Chris Miller. Both candidates had previously served on the City Council. The Aldermen voted one for Seibert and six for Yancey.
Barnes appointed Yancey to serve on the City Council effective January 1. Barnes entertained a motion to confirm the appointment. Moser so moved, seconded by Richardson. Motion carried unanimously. Barnes thanked Seibert for applying to the position.
Barnes announced that Oath of Office would take place on Wednesday, January 4 at 6 p.m. at City Hall. He then went on to thank the City Council, Short, and Grabowski for their service to the city this term and gave his appreciation for the work they have accomplished.
“It truly has been an honor to serve with y’all this last term, I’m looking forward to the next two years. Y’all have done a great job, together we have accomplished a lot. I’m proud of what we have done,” said Barnes.
Yow added, “I just want to say it has been a pleasure working with you Mr. Mayor. I think we have done a lot of good and I look forward to a good two years ahead and being able to accomplish more for the City of Horseshoe Bend, all of us working together.”
With no further business to come before the council, Yow moved to adjourn, seconded by Moser. Motion passed unanimously.
The next City Council meeting will be held on Monday, January 30 at 6 p.m. at City Hall.